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The evolution of womens fight for equal opportunities

List of 5 causes for the gender pay gap.

  • In the 20th century, war was good for women workers;
  • Rank in order of importance - 1 being most important 5 being least - and discuss why you have ranked it in that order;
  • Following campaigning by trade unions, there was much progress on equal pay as new laws extended and strengthened the first equal pay legislation;
  • In 1918, at the beginning of World War I, the United States Employment Service published lists of jobs that were suitable for women in order to encourage men in those occupations to switch to jobs that supported the war effort.

List 5 causes of the gender pay gap. Rank in order of importance - 1 being most important 5 being least - and discuss why you have ranked it in that order.

Equal Pay Act

Now re-rank these 5 causes in order of "difficulty to change". Discuss the reasons why these two lists are different.

What solutions could be developed to tackle the most important and the most difficult-to-change causes of gender pay gap? The history of the struggle for equal pay In Britain, as in every country in the world, women have historically been paid less than men for doing the same job.

Contrary to widespread belief, this struggle for equal pay did not start in the 1960s, but has been taken up by women workers since the late 19th century.

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When they realised that they were expected to do exactly the same work as men but for lower wages, they raised the issue of equal pay through several strikes during this period. One of the early strikes for equal pay was in 1918 by women tram and bus conductorswhich resulted in a settlement of a bonus in pay equal to that paid to men workers.

How far have women’s rights advanced in a century?

Women workers also campaigned against these injustices. In 1968, the issue of equal pay hit the newspaper headlines. Still not quite equal pay, was it?

Gender pay gap and the struggle for equal pay

However, their actions contributed to the campaign for equal pay and the passage of the Equal Pay Act 1970. According to this act, men and women are entitled to equal pay and terms of employment.

  • Government employed 500 women in the Treasury department, but that they made only half as much as their male colleagues;
  • What solutions could be developed to tackle the most important and the most difficult-to-change causes of gender pay gap?

A pamphlet demanding equal pay for equal work in 1944 -when most unions had not taken up that demand. During these years employers often re-graded jobs by changing job titles to evade the Equal Pay Act and to justify unequal wages for men and women doing the same jobs, for example, from Personal Assistant to Typist. Following campaigning by trade unions, there was much progress on equal pay as new laws extended and strengthened the first equal pay legislation.

  • What solutions could be developed to tackle the most important and the most difficult-to-change causes of gender pay gap?
  • Where women are members of trade unions, they have been helped by their union to take their case to the employment tribunal;
  • Trade unions have criticised this move — which ministers claim will save money for businesses and taxpayers — as the latest attack on workers' fundamental rights.

According to this Act, men and women are entitled to equal pay and conditions if they are doing the same job; like work work that is the same or broadly similar ; work rated as equivalent different work, but which is rated under a job evaluation scheme as equivalent ; or work of equal value that is, work that requires similar effort, skill and decision-making.

Under this law, it is possible to bring a claim up to six years after leaving a job. Limitations and directions for the future Forty years after the first equal pay legislation, women can still expect to be paid less than men.

Here's the History of the Battle for Equal Pay for American Women

However, it still remains very difficult for women to gain equal pay. A woman has to first find out that she is being paid less than a man in a comparable job - people are often secretive about how much they are paid. It also takes a lot of money and time to bring a case against an employer who will have far more resources than an individual employee. Where women are members of trade unions, they have been helped by their union to take their case to the employment tribunal. Trade unions have criticised this move — which ministers claim will save money for businesses and taxpayers — as the latest attack on workers' fundamental rights.

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By charging upfront fees for harassment and abuse claims, the government is making it easier for employers to get away with the most appalling behaviour. On 26 July 2017, in a case against the government brought by the trade union, UNISON, fees for those bringing employment tribunal claims have been ruled unlawful.

  1. Taking over the family reins when she gets home, Jennie holds Jackie, 2, who tests cake which he "helped" housekeeper Sophia Flewelling left to bake. Rank in order of importance - 1 being most important 5 being least - and discuss why you have ranked it in that order.
  2. Women workers also campaigned against these injustices. Last year, a bill that would have made it illegal for employers to retaliate against employees who discuss their wages failed in the Senate.
  3. Still not quite equal pay, was it? Britain's highest court unanimously ruled that the fees contravene both EU and UK law such as the Equality Act 2010 and are "discriminatory" against women as they disproportionately affected women.
  4. In 2009, President Obama chose the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act as his first piece of legislation, which restores some protections against discrimination that had been stripped in a 2007 Supreme Court case, and incentivizes employers to make their payrolls more fair.
  5. In 1968, the issue of equal pay hit the newspaper headlines. The Supreme Court ruled that the Government's employment tribunal fees are "illegal" and preventing people - especially those on lower incomes — from getting justice.

Britain's highest court unanimously ruled that the fees contravene both EU and UK law such as the Equality Act 2010 and are "discriminatory" against women as they disproportionately affected women. The Supreme Court ruled that the Government's employment tribunal fees are "illegal" and preventing people - especially those on lower incomes — from getting justice.

Explain 20 mins Using the information within this section, create your own timeline explaining the history of the struggle for equal pay in the UK.