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The communication quality between doctor and foreign patient

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Communication between physicians and patients is particularly challenging when patients do not speak the local language in Switzerland, they are known as allophones.

Doctor-Patient Communication: A Review

To assess the effectiveness of an intervention to improve communication skills of physicians who deal with allophone patients. Two consecutive samples of patients attending the medical outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in French-speaking Switzerland. The intervention consisted of training physicians in communicating with allophone patients and working with interpreters.

  1. It will not be a short journey, but at least we will have something to talk about along the way.
  2. Interpreter use and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects of care for Spanish-speaking patients.
  3. Self-monitoring of blood glucose.
  4. For example, in the 1950s to 1970s, most doctors considered it inhumane and detrimental to patients to disclose bad news because of the bleak treatment prospect for cancers. In contrast, physicians' assessments did not change significantly.

French-speaking patients served as the control group. The outcomes measured were: At baseline, mean scores of patients' assessments of communication were lower for allophone than for francophone patients.

Intercultural doctor-patient communication in daily outpatient care: relevant communication skills

In contrast, physicians' assessments did not change significantly. The quality of communication as perceived by allophone patients can be improved with specific training aimed at primary care physicians. Selected References These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article.

Improving communication between physicians and patients who speak a foreign language.

Ethnicity, nationality and health care accessibility in Kuwait: Effect of language barriers on follow-up appointments after an emergency department visit. J Gen Intern Med. Limited English proficiency and Latinos' use of physician services. Med Care Res Rev. Language concordance as a determinant of patient compliance and emergency room use in patients with asthma.

INTRODUCTION

The impact of language as a barrier to effective health care in an underserved urban Hispanic community. Mt Sinai J Med.

Language barriers and resource utilization in a pediatric emergency department. Is language a barrier to the use of preventive services? Self-monitoring of blood glucose: Interpreter use and satisfaction with interpersonal aspects of care for Spanish-speaking patients.

Are Latinos less satisfied with communication by health care providers?

Conflicts of Interest

Impact of language barriers on patient satisfaction in an emergency department. Language barriers in medicine in the United States. Communication through interpreters in healthcare: Impact of interpreter services on delivery of health care to limited-English-proficient patients.

Interpreter services in healthcare. Policy recommendations for healthcare agencies. Addressing language barriers to health care, a survey of medical services in Switzerland.

Language difficulties in an outpatient clinic in Switzerland. Satisfaction des patients en milieu ambulatoire: Comparison of patient satisfaction with ambulatory visits in competing health care delivery settings in Geneva, Switzerland. J Epidemiol Community Health. Measuring attributes of primary care: Methodological problems in comparing English-speaking and Spanish-speaking patients' satisfaction with interpersonal aspects of care. Lowering the language barrier in an acute psychiatric setting.

Let’s talk about improving communication in healthcare

Aust N Z J Psychiatry. Working with an interpreter in psychiatric assessment and treatment.

  1. This integrative literature review aimed to identify interventions that improve communication between nurses and physicians in ICUs.
  2. This was illustrated in their study when female patients from a lower socioeconomic demographic in the Appalachian region of the United States modified advice to avoid sun exposure and, by taking into account societal pressures that equated tanned skin with beauty, continued tanning despite knowledge of the risks associated with sun exposure and skin cancer Figure. Conclusion We showed that doctors did practice some but not all the relevant ICC skills and that the ICC style of the doctors was mainly biomedically centred.
  3. For example, in the 1950s to 1970s, most doctors considered it inhumane and detrimental to patients to disclose bad news because of the bleak treatment prospect for cancers.
  4. The increasingly complex needs of patients, an explosion of medical knowledge, and seismic shifts in healthcare systems have set the stage for a need for more effective communication. To assess the effectiveness of an intervention to improve communication skills of physicians who deal with allophone patients.

J Nerv Ment Dis. The meaning of patient satisfaction: