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Parents influence and expectations from a child in the poem societys child

Teachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors. The first psychologist to systematically study this was a Harvard professor named Robert Rosenthalwho in 1964 did a wonderful experiment at an elementary school south of San Francisco.

The idea was to figure out what would happen if teachers were told that certain kids in their class were destined to succeed, so Rosenthal took a normal IQ test and dressed it up as a different test.

  1. Change how you react to challenging behaviors. Guiding readers and writers, grades 3-6.
  2. They can also see, Pianta tells me, how teacher expectations affect both their behaviors and classroom dynamics. A closer look might provide insight into how this experience will assist in Rachel's development.
  3. How children think and learn. As a toddler, many remember the silly antics and language of a Dr.
  4. In other words, if you want to change a mind, simply talking to it might not be enough. Diane is a powerful model for Rachel when she demonstrates how to hold a book, which end of the book goes up, and which side is the front; when she takes care to turn the pages, always looks to the right page before moving on to the left page, and starts at the top of the page and moves down; when she reads with tone, inflection, enthusiasm, and expresses excitement and joy; when she points to pictures and words as she reads and pauses to discuss what she is thinking; and when she responds appropriately to Rachel's comments or questions.
  5. Supporting Children's Experiences with Literature Linguistic, social, emotional, and cognitive development are complementary processes that ultimately work together to shape a child's literacy growth Vygotsky, 1978.

After the kids took the test, he then chose from every class several children totally at random. There was nothing at all to distinguish these kids from the other kids, but he told their teachers that the test predicted the kids were on the verge of an intense intellectual bloom.

  • This is why Pianta thinks that to change beliefs, the best thing to do is change behaviors;
  • With this in mind, the framework will assist in planning appropriate literature experiences and in understanding children's responses to books and book preferences at different levels of development.

As he followed the children over the next two years, Rosenthal discovered that the teachers' expectations of these kids really did affect the students. But just how do expectations influence IQ? As Rosenthal did more research, he found that expectations affect teachers' moment-to-moment interactions with the children they teach in a thousand almost invisible ways.

Teachers give the students that they expect to succeed more time to answer questions, more specific feedback, and more approval: They consistently touch, nod and smile at those kids more. Watch how each student interacts.

How do they prefer to engage? What do they seem to like to do?

Preschool-Kindergarten

Observe so you can understand all they are capable of. Try to understand what motivates them, what their goals are and how they view you, their classmates and the activities you assign them. Talk with students about their individual interests. Don't offer advice or opinions — just listen.

  • In the far left-hand column of the framework, an overview of the general developmental characteristics of children in the areas of cognitive, language, social, emotional, and literacy development is provided;
  • As a result, this literature experience was not as beneficial for the majority of these preschoolers as perhaps another book selection might have been.

Change how you react to challenging behaviors. Rather than responding quickly in the moment, take a breath.

Realize that their behavior might just be a way of reaching out to you. Each week, spend time with students outside of your role as "teacher.

Your job is to NOT teach but watch, listen and narrate what you see, focusing on students' interests and what they do well.

This type of activity is really important for students with whom you often feel in conflict or who you avoid. Know what your students like to do outside of school. Make it a project for them to tell you about it using some medium in which they feel comfortable: Find both individual and group time for them to share this with you. Watch and listen to how skilled, motivated and interested they can be.

Now think about school through their eyes. Think back on your own best and worst teachers, bosses or supervisors. List five words for each that describe how you felt in your interactions with them.

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform

How did the best and the worst make you feel? What specifically did they do or say that made you feel that way? Now think about how your students would describe you. Jot down how they might describe you and why. How do your expectations or beliefs shape how they look at you? Are there parallels in your beliefs and their responses to you? Is it possible to change bad expectations? Pianta, dean of the Curry School, has studied teachers for years, and one of the first things he told me when we sat down together was that it is truly hard for teachers to control their expectations.

The demands on their thinking are so great. The traditional way, Pianta says, has been to sit teachers down and try to change their expectations through talking to them. He says it's not effective to try to change their thoughts; the key is to train teachers in an entirely new set of behaviors. For years, Pianta and his colleagues at the Curry School have been collecting videotapes of teachers teaching. By analyzing these videos in minute ways, they've developed a good idea of which teaching behaviors are most effective.

They can also see, Pianta tells me, how teacher expectations affect both their behaviors and classroom dynamics.

  • A closer look might provide insight into how this experience will assist in Rachel's development;
  • From this point of view, learning is not the result of development; rather, learning is development;
  • Jalongo 1985 points out, "Because young children are learning to distinguish between fantasy and reality, events that are incongruous with their expectations are considered to be funny" p;
  • They took a group of teachers, assessed their beliefs about children, then gave a portion of them a standard pedagogy course, which included information about appropriate beliefs and expectations;
  • Observe so you can understand all they are capable of.

Pianta gives one very specific example: I know the answer! You're out of line here!

Cognitive Development

We need you to sit down right now. He will then be likely to escalate his behavior, which will simply confirm the teacher's beliefs about him, and the teacher and kid are stuck in an unproductive loop. But if the teacher doesn't carry those beliefs into the classroom, then the teacher is unlikely to see that behavior as threatening. But also, I want you to sit down quietly now as you tell that to me,' " Pianta says. They took a group of teachers, assessed their beliefs about children, then gave a portion of them a standard pedagogy course, which included information about appropriate beliefs and expectations.

Another portion got intense behavioral training, which taught them a whole new set of skills based on those appropriate beliefs and expectations. For this training, the teachers videotaped their classes over a period of months and worked with personal coaches who watched those videos, then gave them recommendations about different behaviors to try. After that intensive training, Pianta and his colleagues analyzed the beliefs of the teachers again. What he found was that the beliefs of the trained teachers had shifted way more than the beliefs of teachers given a standard informational course.

This is why Pianta thinks that to change beliefs, the best thing to do is change behaviors. In other words, if you want to change a mind, simply talking to it might not be enough.