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Hinduism in one nation under gods by dr peter manseau

He tells his story so well that I can in my mind recreate the book from the first chapter to the last and not miss a chapter in the telling. Within each story the author will put the story into the context of the time and then tie the pieces to The author tells a series of stories from 1492 until today, and he tells the stories so well that if I were to pick a random year, I could tell you which story the author told and also tell you the chapter that came before and the chapter that came after.

Within each story the author will put the story into the context of the time and then tie the pieces together. The best way to illustrate his technique is to highlight one of his chapters, Mary Moody Emerson, known as the baby who was at one of the first battles of the Revolutionary War, saw a Hindu give a talk at her boarding house, this made her aware of beliefs beyond her own, and while she lived with her nephew, Ralph Waldo Emerson, she taught how one could think beyond their own certainties, and that led to the Transcendental Movement and led to Moby Dick by Melville.

A chapter after will be about San Francisco and the Chinese, and a chapter before was on the burning of the Capitol in the War of 1812 and Jefferson's library.

  • A New American History" it is hard to escape the conclusion that America as a society came into existence as distinctly Christian;
  • Within each chapter he ties each piece into a coherent whole and puts the context around the story, and between each chapter he relates it to the previous chapter such that he writes an incredibly interesting set of stories which gives everyone a peek into how a country is seamlessly woven together into a tapestry of different pieces which only makes sense after the whole is observed;
  • A chapter after will be about San Francisco and the Chinese, and a chapter before was on the burning of the Capitol in the War of 1812 and Jefferson's library;
  • Understanding that fact is a good first step toward resolving much of the religious tensions currently dividing american communities and clogging up the courts.

Everything connects within this book, both within the chapters and between the chapters. Within each chapter he ties each piece into a coherent whole and puts the context around the story, and between each chapter he relates it to the previous chapter such that he writes an incredibly interesting set of stories which gives everyone a peek into how a country is seamlessly woven together into a tapestry of different pieces which only makes sense after the whole is observed.

I found each of the stories awe inspiring. He is that good of a story teller, and he'll always tell you why the story matters today.

One Nation, Under Gods: A New American History

I have it as an audio book, which makes it difficult to go back and check details, so I can't offer much by way of review. The author's point is that America has been, since its earliest days, a religious melting pot. He starts with the beliefs of the Taino, a native people of the Caribbean at the time of Columbus's visit, and works forward in time. Lots on good stuff here. For instance, apparently, many Africans brought to this country as slaves were Muslims, and sla This was quite interesting.

For instance, apparently, many Africans brought to this country as slaves were Muslims, and slave owners were, for a long while, reluctant to encourage the conversion of their slaves to Christianity due to the discomfort which might arise from enslaving a fellow Christian. Manseau talks about religious differences of opinion among the Puritans Anne Hutchinson and Co.

  • Everything connects within this book, both within the chapters and between the chapters;
  • The chapter on american Buddhists, with a focus on Japanese-American soldiers sent to the front while their families were imprisoned in internment camps, is especially poignant;
  • A New American History" it is hard to escape the conclusion that America as a society came into existence as distinctly Christian;
  • He gives these relatively little time, focusing instead on the stories of how the individuals and groups became integrated or didn't into American culture.

The author does not deny that Christianity has been the majority faith in the U. My only complaint is that I wish Manseau went into more detail on the specifics of the various religious beliefs.

He gives these relatively little time, focusing instead on the stories of how the individuals and groups became integrated or didn't into American culture.

In most of the stories, the focus is on difficulties caused by racism and cultural and ethnic differences, rather than specifics of the various faiths held by groups in question.

Still, many fine stories about groups of people who often get little time in the history books — an enjoyable book! A New American History" it is hard to escape the conclusion that America as a society came into existence as distinctly Christian. It also becomes clear that America as a nation has been religiously diverse since its creation. Standing between these apparent contradictions is the fact that America's founding documents were carefully crafted to protect that diversity and to a certain extent promote pluralism.

Mansaeau's history chronicles that diversity and how it has struggled to survive in the face of overwhelming cultural and institutional resistance. The book is not written as a diatribe, but the history of faith and religion in america inevitably reads as a litany of religious intolerance and even outright persecution.

  • It also becomes clear that America as a nation has been religiously diverse since its creation;
  • Within each chapter he ties each piece into a coherent whole and puts the context around the story, and between each chapter he relates it to the previous chapter such that he writes an incredibly interesting set of stories which gives everyone a peek into how a country is seamlessly woven together into a tapestry of different pieces which only makes sense after the whole is observed.

The chapter on american Buddhists, with a focus on Japanese-American soldiers sent to the front while their families were imprisoned in internment camps, is especially poignant. I think the modern american Christians claiming persecution and discrimination would do well to read this book to put their grievances in perspective.

Manseau concludes the book with an affirmation that while America's history may be as a de facto Christian nation, it was never an official Christian nation. Understanding that fact is a good first step toward resolving much of the religious tensions currently dividing american communities and clogging up the courts.

  1. Everything connects within this book, both within the chapters and between the chapters.
  2. Everything connects within this book, both within the chapters and between the chapters. The best way to illustrate his technique is to highlight one of his chapters, Mary Moody Emerson, known as the baby who was at one of the first battles of the Revolutionary War, saw a Hindu give a talk at her boarding house, this made her aware of beliefs beyond her own, and while she lived with her nephew, Ralph Waldo Emerson, she taught how one could think beyond their own certainties, and that led to the Transcendental Movement and led to Moby Dick by Melville.
  3. Still, many fine stories about groups of people who often get little time in the history books — an enjoyable book! In most of the stories, the focus is on difficulties caused by racism and cultural and ethnic differences, rather than specifics of the various faiths held by groups in question.
  4. I think the modern american Christians claiming persecution and discrimination would do well to read this book to put their grievances in perspective.
  5. For instance, apparently, many Africans brought to this country as slaves were Muslims, and sla This was quite interesting. For instance, apparently, many Africans brought to this country as slaves were Muslims, and slave owners were, for a long while, reluctant to encourage the conversion of their slaves to Christianity due to the discomfort which might arise from enslaving a fellow Christian.