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Crm old wine in a new bottle

The faster marketers invent new acronyms, the harder it is for them to remember the basics Woolly thinking and an amateurish approach prevail Marketers just love initials — which is a shame.

What does that mean to you? Last year a U. As their entry ticket to an in-group? To conceal their ignorance?

  1. The certain result is confusion, though.
  2. I can easily visualise a meeting in which people spend their time exchanging initials, jargon — and misunderstandings — for hours on end without achieving anything. Any marketing paradigm, be it relationship or collaboration based, can prove effective only if marketing is seen as a philosophy cutting across the organisation and not as a functional silo performed by marketing department.
  3. The certain result is confusion, though.
  4. For successful implementation of CRM, the whole organisation culture — the way people think and behave — needs to be made consumer friendly.
  5. This grew into the CRM we all know and love.

The certain result is confusion, though. I can easily visualise a meeting in which people spend their time exchanging initials, jargon — and misunderstandings — for hours on end without achieving anything. Do you think all this is a trivial matter? I believe it costs marketers billions; and in this piece I shall examine why, with particular reference to CRMwhich is without doubt the biggest new fad around. Show people how they can do something — lose weight, learn a language — with less effort, and you have a winning proposition.

You must wrap it up in new packaging, though — preferably something that sounds impressive.

Old wine in a new bottle

Marketers are just as lazy as customers — hardly surprising when you think about it, since they are customers in their real lives. A brilliant salesman David Ogilvy told me he was the best he ever met he soon started casting around for new, more appealing packaging. Then there was Curriculum Marketing — because you are taking prospects through a sequence leading to a sale. That never caught on, really; maybe it sounds a bit too much like hard work. And of course there was Relationship Marketing, based on the fact that we are trying to build a relationship with customers.

This grew into the CRM we all know and love. Personally I feel this ingenuity has caused needless confusion. Going back to the meeting I visualised above, people must have wasted countless long, tedious days in such meetings - without knowing they were all discussing the same thing under different names.

Somewhere in the middle of all this torrent of nomenclature, out popped Database Marketing, which at one time looked like being the phrase, and has a great deal of logic, as the database lies at the heart of what we do, whatever we choose to call it.

Database Marketing sounds pleasingly scientific and important. I mean, which would you prefer to announce as your metier at a cocktail party? Direct Marketing — or Database Marketing? The trouble is, it is serious and challenging; so much so that half the people doing it are not very good.

One problem is that woolly thinking and crm old wine in a new bottle amateurish approach prevail. Consider this definition of Relationship Marketing. More to the point, it is what I call direct marketing without balls, because there is no mention of testing.