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Compare and contrast comic book hero s with mythology

Understanding the Mythology of Now Superheroes accomplish something outside of simply following mythic structure—they augment mythology itself.

The creation of superheroes and the books in which they are found function as part of our own modern mythology; just as folktales, fairy tales, and ancient myths say something about the cultures from whence they spring, superheroes are part of a uniquely American mythology. While comics and superheroes are no longer solely an American property, the invention of these things says a lot about the culture and attitude of our culture.

Comic books are the American mythology, and, much in the same way Zeus and Poseidon and Perseus come down to us from the Greeks, Superman and Batman and the X-Men represent the culture that birthed them. These are our Gods and Heroes, our stories—and our commentary on our society.

The early days of comic books clearly show the aspiration and American idealism of the time in which they were written—the feel-good resolutions, the perfect heroes, the general attitude of optimism.

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Comic books have chronicled our history, and touched on World War II, the War on Drugs, the current climate of terrorism. Superheroes have changed with the times, as have their costumes and accessories—but not as much as their attitudes; and, in fact, that attitude of comics in general.

No longer completely bright and shiny, comics and comic characters are sometimes cynical and sardonic, with the heroes themselves being presented as increasingly flawed. Comics reflect the attitude and feeling of the society. Superman will be here long after any of us—the idea of him and who he was, the embodiment of the highest concentration of Idealism and Virtue will outlast the nation that gave him life, and perhaps even its memory.

With the representation of these heroes, this is the mythology compare and contrast comic book hero s with mythology we give to the world years after we disappear. That is one of the many reasons why I have always been completely fascinated by superheroes — one of the reasons I have loved them since I was a child, one of the reasons why my birthday cake was shaped like Superman or Batman or Wolverine every year.

Because, even as a child, though I was incapable of processing their importance on a conscious level, my very human psyche recognized the need for them, and was inspired by them. Why We All Love Them: Understanding the Universal Appeal of Super Heroes Going further with mythology, we can look at things in terms of storytelling, and how myths of Superheroes, like all heroes, appeal to us on a number of levels; certainly, they excite us and delight us because they are cool, but they also appeal to us on a deep psychological level, for reasons both obvious and subtle.

The prototypical journey of self-evolution, represented visually. To give you a very brief description, Campbell was a mythologist who looked at myths across cultures, and focused not on how or where they diverged, but how they converged; that is, looking at what the myths from various cultures had in common.

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What he discovered is that regardless of when they are written or how far apart geographically, myths from all cultures tend to follow a particular structure. Again, a full discussion of the Monomyth is a bit too large for this writing, but the important thing is the impact of the idea. The fact that nearly every culture tells stories in the same way says something about the collective mindset of humans as a whole: We need heroes—super and otherwise—and we need their stories to be told in a way that satisfies us on levels beyond our understanding.

As a reader, you are inexorably drawn to the hero, learn things as he learns them, see the story from his perspective.

  1. Born from Hippolyta as Warrior Princess Diana of Themyscira, she was released to the realm of humans by Hera as champion of the Amazons. I want to feel that, if called upon, I could save the day, save the girl, save the world.
  2. Culturally, these stories give us a greater understanding of and context for conduct within our society, as well as an idealized version of what that society can achieve. But Wonder Woman is directly intertwined with Greek mythology.
  3. His questionable and criticized behaviors and acts like practising seidr and doing things that considered effeminate came by his out of box thinking, which didn't prevent Norse or other Germanic peoples to worship him, on the contrary inspired them and made the god interesting, not one dimensional like say Thor. While he does have a bit of Achilles in him only one weakness; kryptonite , he mainly resembles the king of gods.
  4. We have demigods only a notch above normal human warrior like Sarpedon; then we have exceptional individuals pulling off miraculous things. Because, even as a child, though I was incapable of processing their importance on a conscious level, my very human psyche recognized the need for them, and was inspired by them.

Eventually, you identify with him. We identify with the hero for a few reasons, not least of which is that, we want to be heroic: However, most of us do not see ourselves as superheroes, initially; and so it would be hard to identify with a hero if he starts off that way. Therefore, the identification happens in part, by virtue of the way we tell stories. We can identify with them at the beginning, and we grow as they grow, cultivating that identification and carrying that identification all the way to the end.

When we watch their struggles, we feel like it is us, and we can identify with them overcoming these challenges.

  • His questionable and criticized behaviors and acts like practising seidr and doing things that considered effeminate came by his out of box thinking, which didn't prevent Norse or other Germanic peoples to worship him, on the contrary inspired them and made the god interesting, not one dimensional like say Thor;
  • That's the real feat expected from any form of story-telling;
  • Ares disliked their existence as a whole, and a deal was made that pretty much incites that if Wonder Woman is to ever fall in battle, the Amazons will be destroyed.

In other words, we inherently want to experience the Quest and the growth it brings. Culturally, these stories give us a greater understanding of and context for conduct within our society, as well as an idealized version of what that society can achieve. Or, perhaps better stated, these stories help us realize that striving for positive personal change places us in the best position to change the world for the better.

In the context of training, they encourage you to get better so that you can be better—for others.

Comic Books, Superheroes, and the Greek gods

It was the time a friend of mine was knocked unconscious at a music festival, and I had the strength to literally carry her, in my arms, nearly a mile to see a medic. In other words, on a very real level, I train to be a superhero.

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I want to know that I could help someone. I want to feel that, if called upon, I could save the day, save the girl, save the world. Whatever it is, I would like to be able to perform in that moment—and I believe on some level, most of you do too. That is why superheroes speak to us.

Understanding Heroism: A Look at Modern Mythology and the (Super) Appeal of Superheroes

And because they have always spoken to me, I have never been more excited than when I get to create things that will help people develop those qualities. When I get to take the knowledge that I have gained with training and nutrition over the last 10 years of my life, and marry them to everything that inspired me during the first 10 years.

The culmination of my quest to develop programs that will help people achieve a superhero body is the Superhero Workout program.