Term papers writing service


An introduction to the life of de forest

  • Both he and Thomas Edison were from comfortable middle-class Midwestern backgrounds;
  • Although it was basically correct in principle, its operating quality was poor, and he found himself unable to interest film producers in its possibilities;
  • He developed a sound-on-film optical recording system called Phonofilm and demonstrated it in theatres between 1923 and 1927;
  • In 1907 de Forest was able to broadcast experimentally both speech and music to the general public in the New York City area;
  • We'll examine the driving forces that led him to experiment with sound technology at the beginning of the twentieth century, his world-changing invention of the three- element tube, and his frequent entanglements with US patent law;
  • He completed his doctorate in 1899 and started work at Western Electric, Chicago, Illinois while tinkering on the side.

Like this lesson Share In this lesson, we'll be looking at the life, career, and inventions of prolific inventor and sound innovator Lee De Forest.

We'll examine the driving forces that led him to experiment with sound technology at the beginning of the twentieth century, his world-changing invention of the three- element tube, and his frequent entanglements with US patent law. Early Life Lee De Forest was a prolific inventor, receiving more than 300 patents in his lifetime.

  1. Afterwards, the De Forest Telegraph Company developed a variation on this.
  2. His father, a Congregational minister, became president of Talladega College in Alabama. The signal from this circuit, when fed to an antenna system, was far more powerful and effective than that of the crude transmitters then generally employed and, when properly modulated, was capable of transmitting speech and music.
  3. While working after hours on his own, he developed an electrolytic detector of Hertzian waves.

His life was also characterized by lawsuits in order to gain patent control over his inventions. De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1873. Both he and Thomas Edison were from comfortable middle-class Midwestern backgrounds. His father, a Congregational minister, became president of Talladega College in Alabama.

That year, De Forest was also able to get a scholarship to Yale University to study engineering.

Lee de Forest

He had to convince his father to let him go into this career, writing, I intend to be a machinist and inventor because I have great talents in that direction. In this I think you will agree with me.

  • That year, De Forest was also able to get a scholarship to Yale University to study engineering;
  • By this time he had become interested in electricity, particularly the study of electromagnetic-wave propagation , then being pioneered chiefly by the German Heinrich Rudolf Hertz and the Italian Guglielmo Marconi;
  • By 1906 his first company was insolvent, and he had been squeezed out of its operation;
  • He reported on the presidential election that year in November, though unfortunately when the station signed off the air at 11 pm, it broadcast that the new president was Charles Evans Hughes;
  • His first job was with the Western Electric Company in Chicago, where, beginning in the dynamo department, he worked his way up to the telephone section and then to the experimental laboratory;
  • De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1873.

If this be so, why not allow me to so study as to best prepare myself for that profession? He completed his doctorate in 1899 and started work at Western Electric, Chicago, Illinois while tinkering on the side. In 1901, he moved to New York City, New York, where he used the spark gap responder system he had created which was faster than Guglielmo Marconi's similar device and tested it in Chicago in reporting on yacht races. Marconi is often considered to be the inventor of the radio, having completed early experiments in the 1890s and popularizing the communication system's possibilities.

In 1903, De Forest visited Reginald Fessenden, a rival inventor, who had developed the electrolytic detector.

Afterwards, the De Forest Telegraph Company developed a variation on this. His subsequent radiotelegraph stations were purchased by the US Navy.

However, Fessenden believed that De Forest had stolen the electrolytic detector from him and filed suit for patent infringement. Invention Examples De Forest three-element vacuum tube c. De Forest called this the Audion.

Lee De Forest: Biography, Inventions & Achievements

The innovation of this device and those that followed was in detecting, amplifying and transmitting radio signals. The three-element tube served as an oscillator a device which generates electric currents, like sine waves and when scaled up and used as a detector in a radio receiver, the device created an increase in sensitivity to incoming signals.

He reported on the presidential election that year in November, though unfortunately when the station signed off the air at 11 pm, it broadcast that the new president was Charles Evans Hughes. In fact, when all votes were counted, the president was Woodrow Wilson, re-elected for a second term.

  • But in 1907 he patented a much more promising detector developed in 1906 , which he called the Audion; it was capable of more sensitive reception of wireless signals than were the electrolytic and Carborundum types then in use;
  • De Forest was born in Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1873;
  • Both he and Thomas Edison were from comfortable middle-class Midwestern backgrounds;
  • Nevertheless, De Forest had a great belief in radio's qualities, writing, 'He alone the radio innovator hears the etheric 'call of the wild,' and when it speaks to him in the well-known accents of a distant friend, or when music of silent spirits, coming in from nowhere, sings to him the strains of some well loved earthly melody, his wonder grows, and he trembles at the weirdness of it all.

Nevertheless, De Forest had a great belief in radio's qualities, writing, 'He alone the radio innovator hears the etheric 'call of the wild,' and when it speaks to him in the well-known accents of a distant friend, or when music of silent spirits, coming in from nowhere, sings to him the strains of some well loved earthly melody, his wonder grows, and he trembles at the weirdness of it all.