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An introduction to the history of the human race

Human evolution

I did like his summary of one Arab ethnographer's reasoning behind differences in peoples: I particularly disliked his use of Britain as a model country: Turns out that Cook, like Armstrong, please read also: Based not on primary sources but on other secondary and indeed tertiary sources. Focused mainly on the advent of agriculture as the key moment in history, he finds that it all happened in the middle east, utterly neglecting the significant role of the Americas.

Guess what boys and girls, the Interesting at some levels but just a little too ambitious for its own good. This book was a major disappointment in a significant number of ways.

Herald recommends

No better than G. Blainey's similar effort Short History of the World, and even more sweeping and overextended. Two questions from the book to ponder: It's truly remarkable that humans survived the massive climate changes over the last 4 million years. Oct 24, 2009 Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly rated it liked it Before, historians would only have written accounts, fossils and artifacts to use in their study of the past.

Now, they have an additional tool: By examining DNAs [don't ask me how it is done, the book explains it, but it's beyond my understanding: Then they spread out towards the other parts of the world, mostly by walking, although there are evidence that some of these early humans had travelled by bo Before, historians would only have written accounts, fossils and artifacts to use in their study of the past.

A Brief History of the Human Race

Then they spread out towards the other parts of the world, mostly by walking, although there are evidence that some of these early humans had travelled by boats.

Geography determined not only the culture, but also the appearances of the differents races we know now. In other places, they grew to be tall, white-skinned and blond. They learned to use tools. First, they were made of stones [thus, the "Stone Age": Probably, they discovered that they can produce fire by hitting stones against each other, so they later learned to cook their food and then create metal tools [thus, the "Bronze Age": Then they discovered agriculture.

Civilizations then sprouted from everywhere. To illustrate how long ago these were, watch your reaction when somebody says something happened during the time of Jesus Christ.

You would say, that was a long, long time ago. But that was actually just 2,000 plus years ago. We're talking here of 130,000 years ago. So much of our history is forever lost, except those which can be gleaned from DNAs, as writing was invented only about 10,000 years ago. The book does not discuss all facets of human existence, just some of them which he found interesting. He pointed out, for example, that archeology had unearthed abundant indications of the religious proclivities of prehistoric humans [goods placed in the graves of the deceased, some shrines, etc.: All indications show that the early humans had practiced polytheism [many gods: The gods were like humans [for how else would they be like: Now, great religions like Islam, Judaism and Christianity believe in only one God [monotheism: However, even the Israelites did not practice monotheism immediately.

It was for them at first, i.