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An interpretation of the franklins tale by geoffrey chaucer

Prologue The Franklin says that he will relate an old Breton Lay as best as he can. He asks the pilgrims to excuse his homely style and speech since he is a plain blunt man.

  • However, in the case of this tale, the charisma of the rocks is wholly negative and only influences upon the minds of humans in the tale emotional pain, mental agony, and continued separation from others;
  • The natural atmosphere of the garden also brings the two back to sensibility;
  • It so happened that they started talking;
  • He lived there for two years;
  • A Squire named Aurelius who had been secretly in love with Dorigen for the past two years was also present.

He has no feeling for the colors of rhetoric and speech since the only colors that he has seen are those that are used for paint and the flowers that grow in the meadows.

At last the lady compassionately agreed to accept him as her lord and husband. Arveragus was thrilled and promised to obey all her wishes. They then got married and started living in perfect happiness. After a year or so Arveragus decided to go to Britain to seek training in arms. He lived there for two years. In the meanwhile Dorigen who loved Arveragus more than her own life grew extremely melancholic and grief-stricken in his absence. Her friends comforted her in every way possible.

  • Her friends comforted her in every way possible;
  • He finally mustered up enough courage to declare his love for her;
  • They then got married and started living in perfect happiness;
  • He finally mustered up enough courage to declare his love for her;
  • Aurelius returns to pay the scholar who helped him, as he had promised, but the scholar also waives his debt because he was not successful in winning Dorigen;
  • At last his brother recalled his young student days at Orleans where he had seen a book about white magic.

At last Dorigen took hold of herself and started going for walks with her friends to the seacoast. However the sight of ships only served to remind her of Arveragus. She would further get terrorized at the sight of the black forbidding rocks along the coastline that had been the cause of many unfortunate deaths. Her friends realized that roaming on the coast was only a source of more misery and they thus chose other spots for their amusement.

One day in May, Dorigen went to a picnic. A Squire named Aurelius who had been secretly in love with Dorigen for the past two years was also present. He had never revealed his feelings and suffered silently.

  1. What exists is only a structural similarity. The natural atmosphere of the garden also brings the two back to sensibility.
  2. She wept continuously for two days railing against fortune. Aurelius despaired since this was an impossible task and implored her to reconsider.
  3. The magician demanded a sum of thousand pounds for the job.
  4. But some critics hold that the tale does not form part of the marriage group simply because there is no way of ascertaining that Chaucer held the same view.

It so happened that they started talking. He finally mustered up enough courage to declare his love for her. Dorigen refused his advances resolutely. Aurelius despaired since this was an impossible task and implored her to reconsider. When she refused he went away with a heavy heart. He desperately prayed to Apollo to entreat his sister Lucina, goddess of the sea, to send such a massive tide that it would drown all the rocks on the coast of Brittany for two years.

He then fainted and remained unconscious for a long time.

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However Aurelius was torn apart by distress and lay bed ridden for two years. Only his brother knew that he was afflicted by the sorrow of unrequited love. At last his brother recalled his young student days at Orleans where he had seen a book about white magic.

He rejoiced that finally a solution had been found and that expert conjurers might be able to produce a illusion making it appear as if all the rocks had disappeared from the coast of Brittany. The magician demanded a sum of thousand pounds for the job. Aurelius readily agreed and the magician made the rocks disappear. Aurelius then went to meet Dorigen at the temple and demanded that she fulfill her end of the bargain. Dorigen who had been certain that the preposterous condition would never be met was horrified and went home in a miserable state of mind.

She wept continuously for two days railing against fortune. When Arveragus returned home she told him the entire story. Arveragus told her that she must honor her promise even though it would hurt him deeply.

He then sent Dorigen to Aurelius. Aurelius then found that he only had five hundred pounds to give to the magician and begged him to give him two years to pay the rest of the amount. When the magician learned what had happened he too to acted like a gentleman and pardoned his fees.

The Canterbury Tales: Novel Summary: The Franklin's Tale

The Franklin ends his tale with an appeal to the pilgrims to say which character was the most generous. The Franklin himself calls his story a lay.

However scholars have not been able to trace any single source for the tale. Although these two tales have been grouped together there is no thematic link between the two. What exists is only a structural similarity. While he enthusiastically commends the Squire for his wit, eloquence and story-telling ability, he is unaware that the Squire has bungled his tale by rambling on about the same point.

The tale is set in Brittany and peopled with characters of noble birth. Moreover the characters act generously and in accordance with the highest ideals of conduct. The lovely lady Dorigen refuses to be unfaithful to her husband in his absence. Arveragus prevails upon Dorigen to honor her promise even though it would hurt him immensely. The magician pardons his fees after learning the details of the entire episode.

  1. Dorigen refused his advances resolutely.
  2. Moreover the characters act generously and in accordance with the highest ideals of conduct. He desperately prayed to Apollo to entreat his sister Lucina, goddess of the sea, to send such a massive tide that it would drown all the rocks on the coast of Brittany for two years.
  3. When she refused he went away with a heavy heart. However the sight of ships only served to remind her of Arveragus.
  4. In the final scene the clerk-magician treats Aurelius to an illusion of his beloved dancing. Nature wears down the walls of self-interest and solipsism and helps individuals form relationships; nature succeeds as the particular phenomenon which brings people together.

All the characters act nobly and in perfect accordance with gentlemanly ideals of behavior. However one has to agree that it is his noble deed that lead to the noble deed of the others. But some critics hold that the tale does not form part of the marriage group simply because there is no way of ascertaining that Chaucer held the same view.