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A study of thompson model of the atom

Thomson's theories, models, and discoveries relating to electrons and the atomic model of the atom impact our understanding of chemistry today. Below we will explore his life, his discoveries, and his model of the atom. Thomson and His Discoveries Many people choose to pursue a career in science, but few impact their field in the way that one English physicist did in the mid 1800s and early 1900s.

This physicist, through his experiments, discovered what would come to be known as the electron.

J.J. Thomson: Biography, Facts & Atomic Theory

He also contributed to the field of chemistry by using this discovery to advance the model of the atom. For these discoveries, he received the Nobel prize in physics, and seven of his former students and assistants also went on to receive Nobel prizes. His name was J. Thomson, and this is the story of his life and his discoveries. Thomson Biography Thomson was born on December 18, 1856. His mother was a textile worker, and his father ran an antique bookstore in England. From an early age, Thomson's interest in science was obvious, and he was admitted to Owens College in 1870 at the young age of 14.

J.J. Thomson Biography

He spent the rest of his academic career at Cambridge. At the young age of 27, Thomson became director of the distinguished Cavendish Laboratory, where he made many discoveries and was an excellent teacher. He married Rose Elizabeth Paget in 1890 and had two children. In 1906, Thomson received the Nobel prize in physics for his discovery of the electron. Two years later, Thomson was knighted. Thomson, winner of the 1906 Nobel prize in physics.

  1. He realized that Rutherford's model wasn't quite right. For one thing, the orbiting electrons should give off energy and eventually spiral down into the nucleus, making the atom collapse.
  2. In 1906, Thomson received the Nobel prize in physics for his discovery of the electron. He was a professor of experimental physics and launched an attempt to build mathematical models to explain the nature of atoms and electromagnetism.
  3. Bohr's theory that electrons existed in set orbits around the nucleus was the key to the periodic repetition of properties of the elements.

Perhaps his greatest contribution, in addition to his discoveries, was his role as a gifted teacher. One of his students, Ernest Rutherford, would go on to disprove Thomson's own model of the atom and eventually take over his post at Trinity College. In total, seven of Thomson's students as well as his own son, all received Nobel prizes for their work.

Discovering the Electron In the mid-1800s, scientists were studying electrical discharge through evacuated tubes, or tubes that were pumped almost empty of air.

  1. Bohr suggested the revolutionary idea that electrons "jump" between energy levels orbits in a quantum fashion, that is, without ever existing in an in-between state. He focused his attention on canal, or anode, rays, which are beams of positive ions created in certain types of vacuum tubes.
  2. He was a professor of experimental physics and launched an attempt to build mathematical models to explain the nature of atoms and electromagnetism.
  3. The plum pudding model became the standard model of the atom used by physicists for many years.
  4. In 1912 Bohr joined Rutherford.
  5. Atomic Structure, Periodicity, and Matter. Thomson received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1906 for his experiments examining discharges of electricity in gases.

These sealed glass tubes, known as cathode-ray tubes, contained a gas inside. When electricity was applied, the tube would glow and emit a ray.

Who was William Thompson?

Different gases would glow different colors because these rays caused the gases to fluoresce, or give off light.

Thomson experiment with cathode rays. Thomson used his experiments to learn more about the properties of these rays, including how different cathodes did not seem to change those properties.

  • In this lesson, learn more about him and his contributions to atomic theory;
  • At the young age of 27, Thomson became director of the distinguished Cavendish Laboratory, where he made many discoveries and was an excellent teacher;
  • But there was good evidence he was right;
  • Or the electrons could be knocked out of position if a charged particle passed by;
  • This physicist, through his experiments, discovered what would come to be known as the electron.

He observed that when a metal plate was exposed to the cathode rays, some negative electrical charges built up on the plate and deflected the ray. Not knowing yet what these charges were, he published a paper in 1897 describing his observations, and he concluded that these rays were actually streams of negatively charged particles that had mass. This paper is generally accepted as the discovery of what would later become known as the electron.