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A review of the play a man of all seasons

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As a devout Catholic, he had serious reservations about the king's divorce from Catherine of Aragon and remarriage to Anne Boleyn. He was found guilty of high treason and executed in 1535.

  • The one major disappointment is Aporup Acharya, who plays More's nemesis, Cromwell;
  • Moreover, the humor is achieved without ever compromising the exalted spirit of this sainted man.

In 1935, he was canonised as St Thomas More. He blames the queen, and wants to dump her.

  • This seems to be a case of miscasting, since he lacks the right physicality and also the range to convey the motivations and layers in this truly dangerous, formidable antagonist;
  • Kobal The film's most significant invention is its portrayal of Richard Rich John Hurt , the solicitor-general;
  • He believed that, by sticking fastidiously to the letter of it, he couldn't be touched; and used the ploy of remaining totally silent when asked why he wouldn't swear allegiance to the Act of Succession, which would give the King absolute power over the Church as well as the State; an Act that most of his peers acquiesced to, out of fear or desire for advancement;
  • Ashish Sen's Duke of Norfolk takes a while to establish character but, once there, is articulate and expressive;
  • More replies that private conscience is more important than public duty.

Contemporary portraits reveal that this was indeed the look Wolsey rocked. More replies that private conscience is more important than public duty. His wife, Alice, doesn't agree, commenting that he could be chancellor of England if Wolsey fell.

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Anyway, the cardinal bungles the divorce, then dies no splash, just a bit of a gurglethe Duke of Norfolk turning up to swipe the chain of office from his deathbed. This is a slight elision of events — Wolsey actually died a year after being stripped of his position. But the politics are accurate. He turns up with an entourage of toffs in pastel cloaks, whose job it seems to be to guffaw at everything he says, then tries to chat up More's daughter, Margaret Roper, by talking to her in Latin and showing her his shapely legs.

The real Henry was proud of his legs, once bragging about them to the French ambassador. Until one of them turned into a mass of ulcers after a nasty jousting accident and, allegedly, the other was eaten away by syphilis.

A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS play review

Still, this scene is set in around 1530. The accident did not happen until 1536, and many historians dispute that Henry ever had syphilis.

  1. He turns up with an entourage of toffs in pastel cloaks, whose job it seems to be to guffaw at everything he says, then tries to chat up More's daughter, Margaret Roper, by talking to her in Latin and showing her his shapely legs. Currently, he is an accredited reviewer for Seen and Heard International, one of the oldest and most widely-read online purveyors of music-criticism, for whom he covers concerts of Western Classical music and Opera in Mumbai.
  2. However, director Hughes and his design team have indeed rendered the Common Man unnecessary.
  3. The accident did not happen until 1536, and many historians dispute that Henry ever had syphilis.
  4. More was forced to choose between compliance with his sovereign's wishes and adherence to his own moral code and conscience.

The film claims that he did. Dialogue The screenplay, based by Robert Bolt on his own stage play, is elegant and subtly witty. He may have been a saint, but he talked like a gangster if gangsters spoke Latin. More disses Luther as a "pimp" and an "arse", claims his mouth is "the shit-pool of all shit", alleges that he celebrated Mass on the lavatory, and lists four types of ordure with which he was apparently filled merda, stercus, lutum and coenum.

Now, I'm not suggesting that the story of the Henrician Reformation be written in the language of The Wire, but … actually, yes, I am.

A Man For All Seasons Review

That would be excellent. And, it seems, historically justifiable. Kobal The film's most significant invention is its portrayal of Richard Rich John Hurtthe solicitor-general.

  1. The real Henry was proud of his legs, once bragging about them to the French ambassador. Naval Narielwala's cameo as King Henry stands out in his able depiction of this mercurial monarch, although he looks older than Henry was at the time.
  2. The script, written in language filled with wit and wisdom, views this battle of wills between the individual and the State through the eyes of the Common Man, who addresses the audience directly and enacts several roles through its course, changing costumes and arranging props as required. The Telegraph's WA Darlington also enjoyed Scofield's "steely sweetness", dubbing him "the only actor I really respect who could play a saint".
  3. As long as these added comments to Simon's on the mark review, bring up the Berkshire Theatre Festival, it was also interesting to see Michel Gill who co-starred in BTF's other summer '08 revival, Candida, show up on the American Airlines Stage as the Duke of Norfolk who, like so many men, don't have the steely conscience to stand firm when under duress.
  4. Some very fine performances add to this engrossing and soul-satisfying experience. That would be excellent.
  5. The Mancunian schoolteacher had already won accolades for his 1957 debut Flowering Cherry, and in A Man For All Seasons, he told the Times he was positively seeking silence. Still, this scene is set in around 1530.

Rich's onscreen backstory, showing a lengthy association with More, is speculative. But the depiction of Rich's probable perjury during More's trial does fit with the record, and with the judgment of most historians.

  • More's silence enraged him;
  • His inability to betray his soul, his "self", ultimately cost him his head;
  • Now, I'm not suggesting that the story of the Henrician Reformation be written in the language of The Wire, but … actually, yes, I am.

In the film, he has done it all to be made attorney-general of Wales.