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A good thesis for a dolls house

Sitemap A Doll's House It seems that Torvald views his wife Nora as many patriarchal men did in that era, that women were not their equal.

He seems to be a bit domineering towards Nora, and reminds her who is truly in charge.

  • Although Nora expresses herself in a childlike way and doesn't appear to be the sharpest tool in the shed, I believe that she has more potential that anyone expects she does;
  • If I had others I concealed them, because he would not have liked it;
  • This shows bravery, determination, and will; all admirable features of an integrous [not a word] character;
  • Therefore, a thesis statement;;;
  • There are multiple themes in a "Doll's House";
  • This might be stated more precisely.

He sees her as vulnerable, and a gullible woman. However, I believe that Torvald does not realize his wife's full potential, that in face she can be the one to make the calls behind his back. For example, Torvald keeps referring to his wife as a "little bird" or "wilful little woman". This belittles Nora, and these names signify how she ultimately has no power in their relationship. It also seems that Torvald thinks that his wife is so gullible that she'll think that Krogstad is "poisoning the minds of their children".

He tells her that it is ultimately her own fault that this is happening, and telling her "Nearly all cases of early corruption may be traced to lying mothers", and " This Krogstad has been poisoning his own children for years past by a life of lies and hypocrisy, that's why I call him morally ruined". Although Nora expresses herself in a childlike way and doesn't appear to be the sharpest tool in the shed, I believe that she has more potential that anyone expects she does.

Nora is a manipulator, and constantly tries to manipulate her husband Torvald. She likes to get what she wants yet believes that she can do it herself most of the time, along with her husband Torvald's money. Behind her own husband, and dying father's backs, Nora has done business with Krogstad and had borrowed money in order to "save her husband's life".

It seems that Nora greatly values nice things, and will do many things in order to have them. Nora uses the fact that Torvald views her as only a helpless woman, as a key to getting what she really wants. She knows that her husband underestimates her full potential, and uses that role as a woman to manipulate and trick her husband. When Nora lied to her husband about not eating the macaroons earlier that day, this reavealed that her relationship with Torvald is definitely not a strong and communicative one.

Obviously, they are not honest with eachother, a good thesis for a dolls house at least Nora is not, and that Nora does not trust Torvald for some reason enough to tell him even the slightest thing. It seems that there must be a reason behind Nora's dishonesty. Most likely Torvald, being very controlling to begin with, will disapprove everything Nora does, which is probably why she keeps it a secret from him.

Torvald's comment "No one would believe how much it costs a man to keep such a little bird as you", reflects Torvald's domineering, patriarchial quality within him. Torvald does not treat his marriage with Nora as an equal union, but more like a burden.

A Doll’s House Essay Sample

He doesn't seem to cherish his wife, but sees her as something that is costing him even more money. Nora's conversation with Mrs. Linden about her getting serious after her husband Torvald is amused with her "skipping about, and dressing up and acting" reveals that Nora is not stupid. She puts on this act for her husband, to make him feel in control.

However, she is the one that has the real control over their financial situation, for she was the one who borrowed all of the money when Torvald was ill and is responsible for the unknown debt they are currently in.

She spends and spends to convince Torvald that there is no financial issues, perhaps spending too much so that Torvald will feel that he is in charge.

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It goes back to Nora's sneaky ways behind her husband's back, she does not tell him the honest truth, therefore she is left to covering up her actions. Torvald nearly convinces his wife Nora that Krogstad, the one whom Nora owes all of the borrowed money to, that krogstad is corrupting them and their children.

He also tells Nora that she is the one to blame, for "all cases of early corruption may be trace to lying mothers. The opening conflict in the play is when Torvald Helmer comes home to his wife Nora decorating the christmas tree, after she had just gone out shopping for christmas gifts. Torvald is a bit annoyed when he hears that Nora was out spending his money. The reality is that Nora is actually covering up that she had in fact borrowed a large amount of money while Torvald was sick, and is acting as if they have no financial strains at all.

The fact that Torvald immediately chastises Nora spending shows their relationship is not equal, and that Torvald has most of the control over their relationship and family decisions. Nora uses her conning and cleverness to convince her husband to give her some spending money, an example of just how sneaky she really is. She considers money the best christmas gift, and that is significant in the play because paying back the debt she made is her primary goal.

He immediately is shocked and tells Nora that he is a good thesis for a dolls house and "poisoning" their and their children's minds. He references that all corruption goes back to the mother's lies, which freaks out Nora, for she committed the same crime as Krogstad. Torvald is the head of the family and also the head of the marriage he shares with his wife Nora.

Usually, in this day and culture, a marriage is an equal union upon which both husband and wife are in control of family decisions.

  1. Nora claims that previously they used to save each penny they got with Torvald from odd jobs to supplement their income. The character of Nora also helps point out that there might some aspects of society which might be incorrect besides the perception of women as the less sharp sex; the law of those days for example.
  2. Her life outlook changes with the change in economic conditions and this indicates injustice in how human beings view financial conditions… Are you enjoying our A Dolls House essay? Nora finally saw the light, that her husband had been in fact a stranger to her for a whole eight years of marriage.
  3. However, as he soon recognizes Nora's seriousness, Torvald quickly gets more desperate and we see a side that no one had seen before.
  4. Rank's relationship with Nora is very signficant in a "Doll's House" because it shows Nora what real affection is. Linde a novel job as the story continues.

However, Torvald domineers over Nora and treats her like she lesser than he. He calls her "little bird" or "squirrel" which makes it how obvious he views her as someone without power.

He chastises her over spending yet relents when she begs. Their communication is slim in their relationship, for he doesn't see her as someone he can openly talk to. He actually sees his wife as a burden and property rather than someone to love and cherish. He goes on and on about how much she is costing him, and how she is spending too much on gifts and new things. It's a bit ironic, because even though Torvald feels he has the most control over her, it's actually the opposite.

Nora has been taking money from him claiming it's for "shopping", however a good thesis for a dolls house takes that money to pay back the debt she got herself in, without Torvald's knowledge at all.

Nora is a complex character in a "Doll's House". She acts dumb and childish, however she is quite a clever woman. First of all, Nora was sneaky enough to borrow money without her husband Torvald's consent while he was sick, and that has put them in a great deal of debt that she has yet to pay off.

Nora's big lie was left undiscovered by her husband, because she is a conn expert. Nora has spent and spent on things to dodge suspicious thoughts of her husband concerning their financial situation. She spends carelessly on things so that he won't worry about whether they are tight on money. She plays to the role of the unequal wife that needs to be controlled by her husband, because it makes Torvald feel that he holds the reins to their relationship and family.

Even though Torvald is technically in charge of their life, Nora is the one that secretly has a large impact on their situation as well. Nora's comment to Torvald, "Isn't good of me too, to have given into you? By comparing her to her husband, she is trying to get on his level and re-defining the equality of their relationship and marriage. Torvald always puts her down and belittles her, and by saying that she was good have given into his suggestion, she is trying receive kudos as well.

If Torvald allowed his wife and others to influence his decisions, his reputation at the bank would be tarnished. This is a patriarchial society Torvald is living in, and therefore if he allowed his wife to make or even influence his own choices, that would be greatly looked down upon. The other men would see this as emasculating, even embarassing on Torvald's part.

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He wouldn't be taken seriously and would be seen as relenting to a "petticoat government". By hinting about the miracle, Nora is referring to her husband Torvald's miraculous death, for she describes it as "terrible" and "it must not come to pass".

This miracle is not good, and before she was contemplating taking her own life in light of saving her family's reputation for the better, however if her own husband died she would receive money to pay off the debt she still owes. She knows deep down it is not right to wish a death upon one's own husband, but she still secretly wishes for a miraculous death. Analyzing Literary Technique Foreshadowing: Nora asks her nurse why she gave up her child to go work to take care of her.

This question revealed that Anna the nurse, had a daughter with a man who left early on, and had to give her daughter up in order to work as a nurse for Nora as a child.

Nora asks Anna this because she is contemplating on leaving her family. Understanding the Play 8. By "incredible things", Ms.

  • She plays to the role of the unequal wife that needs to be controlled by her husband, because it makes Torvald feel that he holds the reins to their relationship and family;
  • It goes back to Nora's sneaky ways behind her husband's back, she does not tell him the honest truth, therefore she is left to covering up her actions;
  • She knows deep down it is not right to wish a death upon one's own husband, but she still secretly wishes for a miraculous death.

Linden means the tension and immense secrecy between Torvald and his wife Nora. They depict the life of a perfect family towards the public eye, yet their relationship and union is not nearly as perfect as it seems.

  1. It is this secret life that eventually leads to her being freed from that doll house, as she calls it, and ultimately allows her to leave without being afraid to study and learn about herself and society. He tells her that it is ultimately her own fault that this is happening, and telling her "Nearly all cases of early corruption may be traced to lying mothers", and " This Krogstad has been poisoning his own children for years past by a life of lies and hypocrisy, that's why I call him morally ruined".
  2. The play begins at Christmas time and a larger income begins after the New Year.
  3. When he displays no appreciation for the fact that she saved his life by getting him to Italy and its sunny climate when he was so ill, Nora understands the tragedy of her life.
  4. He is affectionate towards her, but in a belittling way in which he refers to her a little "lark" whom he must protect and keep away from trouble. Torvald is restricting Nora and holding her back from doing this, for he lives a life dominated by society rules and regulations.
  5. Another theme is "Socital and Social obligations".

Nora goes behind her own husbands back, and without his permission something considered very scandelous at that time period in a patriarchial societyborrows money and digs them deep into debt. Torvald does not have any knowledge of nora's actions whatsoever, and on top of that, treats his wife like she is a child. Torvald's comment about Nora being entirely his, bothers Nora.

By Torvald telling his wife Nora "I am not to look at my dearest treasure? This in a sense, appears that Torvald sees his wife as only his, one who he has the ability to control completely and do what he pleases with her. Torvald's reaction upon hearing family friend Dr.

Rank's sudden death, reveal a lot about Torvald's character. He doesn't really pay much attention nor sympathizes for anyone about the death. He isn't polite nor curtious about it, and it reveals a lot about Torvald's own selfishness. He is still concerned with the priority of his public image, and if he shows some hint of empathy he believes he would have let his own guard down.

Nora, when listening to her husband Torvald's reaction to Krogstad's letter, finally sees the light on what her husband's true views are. Up to this point, Nora has been counting on a "miracle", in which Torvald would stand up for her and take the blame for the letter instead of being so worried about his own reputation and public image. Unfortunately, Nora's miracle did not take place, and Torvald took action to the letter according to what would protect the family reputation.

Nora finally saw the light, that her husband had been in fact a stranger to her for a whole eight years of marriage. They had never been equal, never having even one serious conversation together, nevertheless being open about their own secrets. Nora realized that she has been controlled by her father and her husband, and never really had the freedom to develop her own opinions and beliefs; something she wishes to pass on to her own children. Torvald, after hearing that his wife Nora is leaving him, goes into complete panic mode.

First, he is primarily concerned with the family reputation a good thesis for a dolls house public image; for a wife leaving her own husband and children was considered highly scandalous in 19th century Europe. He forbids Nora to leave, but despite his pleas, he realizes that she will no longer listen to a word nor command he says. However, as he soon recognizes Nora's seriousness, Torvald quickly gets more desperate and we see a side that no one had seen before.

Previously, Torvald made it seem that he saw his wife as property and a "doll" he could control and command, until now where this desperate situation is causing Torvald to express his genuine emotions. The problems that Nora and Torvald are experiencing are ones due to both the couple's personalities and also society's values at that time period. This is a period that is dominated by men, a partriarchial social ladder that women have no significant role in things such as politics, the work place, and even marriage.

  • Usually like Nora, they were passed from their family onto marriage;
  • Nora belongs to a higher social class and this makes her spend a lot of money;
  • But Krogstad, who works at Torvald's bank, threatens this possibility;
  • The beginning of a new life makes Nora excited;
  • This means that none of the gender parties in this play can be considered as completely just or unjust;
  • This is Nora's fault because all her life she had been used to a man commanding her.

The fact that Torvald and Nora's marriage is not an equal one is not unusual among couples living in the 19th century, but is also the fault of Torvald and his wife. Torvald loves to control his wife, and does not see this as an equal union but more as a business deal.