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3 1 demonstrate methods of providing support taking into account the

  • Learning is everywhere reflected in the environments, the resources, the daily routines and the relationships with parents and carers and of course… the other children;
  • Play is a means for children to establish, practice and test everything they know as well as make sense of what is new;
  • Practitioners as teachers Early years practitioners hold a range of qualifications from apprenticeships to post graduate degrees, with many practitioners having specialist skills and interests through attending various courses;
  • Some linguists take the view that in many ways this is desirable so that the child can gain competence in both languages;
  • For these childre, progress acquiring English can be very rapid which is why it is not a problem for parents to speak only their home language;
  • Learning is everywhere reflected in the environments, the resources, the daily routines and the relationships with parents and carers and of course… the other children.

Numbers, shape, space and measurements, problem-solving Understanding the world How does my world works? Early science, geography, history Music, art and craft, dance, storytelling, drama Summative assessment Regular observation informs planning.

Play partners will often stand aside for a while and leave room for learning, observe carefully what children do and use their observation to try to think what the child will want to do next.

We never test children and children never know they are being assessed; our practitioners adapt activities to suit the age and stage and needs of individuals and extend learning as they see it happen through appropriate challenge. You can arrange to meet with your child's play partner and the nursery manager at any time should you wish to discuss your child's development.

This information is taken from written and visual observations, our experiences with the child and contributions from parents and any other professionals that may be working with the child.

  • You can arrange to meet with your child's play partner and the nursery manager at any time should you wish to discuss your child's development;
  • We never test children and children never know they are being assessed; our practitioners adapt activities to suit the age and stage and needs of individuals and extend learning as they see it happen through appropriate challenge;
  • For children who come into a setting without English, but otherwise used to talking in their home language, we need to be aware of the emotional impact this may have;
  • The most important thing is for the practitioners to check how well the child has progressed since their last assessment regardless of where they are on their personal learning journey;
  • They write their names on artwork; shopping lists or parking fines; they give meaning to the marks they make when they paint and draw.

Appropriate supportive next steps will be planned in each area of learning. The most important thing is for the practitioners to check how well the child has progressed since their last assessment regardless of where they are on their personal learning journey. What does curriculum planning look like?

That way we can be spontaneous and flexible. We plan different activities every day and sometimes we repeat favourite activities to allow children to revisit and consolidate their learning. Specific planned meaningful experiences that differ from what is already readily available to the children in the environment — this means that we enhance the continuous provision. Mixture of adult and child-led.

These are the things that we add as we spot them through observations. For example, if a child likes to be outside, there is little point in putting his favourite toy indoors; if boys have the opportunity to record the number of buckets of gravel they need to make the scales balance, it is more likely that they will engage in mathematics than if we try to keep them indoors.

We always welcome ideas from our families, please feel free to make some suggestions. Practitioner role modelling, behaviour or language. Here we add in what the adult will do or must be aware of with certain activities when considering the needs of the room e. For younger babies the planning will look very different.

It is important to remember with babies we are focusing on Communication and Language, Physical development and Personal, Social and Emotional development, not an end product or post activity discussion. Learning is everywhere reflected in the environments, the resources, the daily routines and the relationships with parents and carers and of course… the other children. Through the Specific areas of learning, children will learn essential skills that will prepare them for school.

A parent's guide to teaching and learning

Counting the number of children at the table, laying the table for lunch and helping to prepare snack, all help to provide the foundations for early mathematics calculation, subtraction and addition. Pouring drinks and serving their own lunch provides opportunities to learn about capacity and develop new physical skills. Sharing books, developing group stories in the role play area and self-registration, all support early reading. Children are encouraged to write for a purpose, so they can see themselves as writers of the future.

Learning and Developing in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

They write their names on artwork; shopping lists or parking fines; they give meaning to the marks they make when they paint and draw. Babies and younger children make marks as they explore the food that they spill on the table or play in shaving foam in the tough-spot. Practitioners as teachers Early years practitioners hold a range of qualifications from apprenticeships to post graduate degrees, with many practitioners having specialist skills and interests through attending various courses.

All are considered as teachers in the context of Early Years. This diversity is important in order that the children we care for have access to many different skill sets and experiences.

  • All are considered as teachers in the context of Early Years;
  • Early science, geography, history Music, art and craft, dance, storytelling, drama Summative assessment Regular observation informs planning;
  • You can arrange to meet with your child's play partner and the nursery manager at any time should you wish to discuss your child's development.

Play is a means for children to establish, practice and test everything they know as well as make sense of what is new.