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Summary of hbr article enemies of trust essay

Here are some of the suggestions offered. The core of empathy and understanding is seeing each other as humans. Too often, we work with people who we know very little about. This means even a little bit of insight into a person can help break down large barriers. Revealing even small things about your personal life can help make someone comfortable opening up about other things such as bigger vulnerabilities. This creates a gradual process of building trust.

Similarly, when we do something good, we assume it is due to our inherent capabilities. When others do well, we attribute it to a situation or luck. The more team members learn about each other, the more they are able to empathize with them. For example, a person may have gone through a traumatic experience in another career or business, and this shapes how they now make decisions.

A little bit of understanding helps create the flexibility to have a more trusting team. It gives team members a forum for providing each other with direct and actionable feedback on how their individual performance can improve the performance of the team. Personality Profiles — Lencioni recommends utilizing the Myers Briggs test.

There summary of hbr article enemies of trust essay lots of tests out there that serve a similar purpose. The idea here is to provide a vocabulary for describing differences and similarities that make it safe to give each other feedback instead of sounding like unfounded generalizations. I personally recommend the DISC profile assessment.

This helps you understand how people think and approach things. For example, it lets you identify who is a big picture person and who is a detail oriented person. To the contrary, it implies the courage to be yourself. Opportunities for vulnerability present themselves to us at work every day.

Examples she gives of vulnerability include calling an employee or colleague whose child is not well, reaching out to someone who has just had a loss in their family, asking someone for help, taking responsibility for something that went wrong at work, or sitting by the bedside of a colleague or employee with a terminal illness.

When angry or fearful, step back and be self-reflective. Strive to put yourself in the shoes of your perceived adversary. Avoid impulsive statements and actions.

Express regret or apology. Gain strength by allowing yourself to be humble and vulnerable. You need to get everyone on your team talking to one another in an honest, meaningful way, and you can use several strategies to accomplish this.

Many ideas I share are common sense. So here are 11 thoughts about trust. Feel free to share these simple reminders with your leaders, colleagues and team. Fear of Conflict The desire to preserve artificial harmony stifles the occurrence of productive ideological conflict.

In short, it becomes impossible to hash out an idea based on its merit. It is important to delineate between conflict over concepts and conflict that is personal. Good conflict does not encompass politics, insults, or personal comments. Healthy conflict is the happy medium between artificial harmony and mean-spirited personal attacks. Great teams do not hold back with one another. They are unafraid to air their dirty laundry. They admit their mistakes, their weaknesses, and their concerns without fear of reprisal Lencioni.

Most people avoid this in order to try to keep some sense of harmony. Instead, it results in tension where people are not able to openly speak up. This ends up creating more politics and the formation of cliques. Feathers should get ruffled in the scope of the discussionbut it is the only way to make the best decision to move forward. Lencioni gives the following characteristics to look for: Teams that fear conflict… Create environments where back-channel politics and personal attacks thrive Ignore controversial topics that are critical to team success Fail to tap into all the opinions and perspectives of team members Waste time and energy with posturing and interpersonal risk management Teams that engage in conflict… Have lively, interesting meetings Extract and exploit the ideas of all summary of hbr article enemies of trust essay members Solve real problems quickly Put critical topics on the table for discussion How do you overcome fear of conflict?

Simply identifying what is positive conflict and acknowledging that it is productive can go a long way. It is also important to look for buried disagreements and try to bring them to light. This forces the team to start working through them. There is also a Depth-Frequency Conflict Model that gives feedback on how team members assess conflict tendencies and identify areas for improvement. Human beings are social animals. And so our priorities may have been wrong all along.

We must focus on creating safe spaces for people to express themselves and take risks. If we do this well, teamwork will be a no-brainer by comparison. This is ironic, because what they are really doing is sti- fling productive conflict and pushing important issues that need to be resolved under the carpet where they will fester.

  1. Many times consensus is sought as a form of CYA or a cover for analysis paralysis. Lencioni gives the following characteristics to look for.
  2. Inattention to Results The pursuit of individual goals and personal status erodes the focus on collective success. For example, a person may have gone through a traumatic experience in another career or business, and this shapes how they now make decisions.
  3. Understanding this process creates a much lower barrier to getting commitment by substantially reducing the consequences of failure. A little bit of understanding helps create the flexibility to have a more trusting team.

Eventually, those unresolved issues transform into uglier and more personal discord when executives grow frustrated at what they perceive to be repeated problems.

What CEOs and their teams must do is learn to identify artificial harmony when they see it, and incite productive conflict in its place. This is a messy process, one that takes time to master. But there is no avoiding it, because to do so makes it next to impossible for a team to make real commitment. It will come back to bite you, and your organization. But all of the principals say there are no major disagreements, just debate and questions and more debate.

As Collins said, if you have a point, you have to be able to defend it.

A-type conflict fosters cynicism, distrust, and avoidance, thereby obstructing open communication and integration. Lack of Commitment The lack of clarity or buy-in prevents team members from making decisions they will stick to.

Commitment builds on the first two dysfunctions. You need trust to produce productive conflict. Productive conflict then enables people to commit with clarity and buy-in. Seeking consensus is a natural inclination but a big mistake. Many times consensus is sought as a form of CYA or a cover for analysis paralysis. People want to get everyone on record as agreeing so that blame can be diffused if something goes wrong. Great teams know that consensus is impossible and works against productive conflict.

Commitment having clarity and buy-in simply means the removal of assumptions and ambiguities, and honest emotional support. They just need to be heard, and to know that their input was considered and responded to Lencioni.

This point is vital because it is a primary cause of politics. This means leaders must go summary of hbr article enemies of trust essay and communicate the results to their teams. It also ensures everyone is on the same page. When leaders are on the same page and all go out and communicate the same message, it sends a powerful message to employees.

Setting deadlines for decisions and creating worst-case scenario contingencies also helps create commitment to decisions. The biggest challenge for a leader in this situation is being okay with making a decision that may ultimately be wrong. How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries — This book by Peter Sims is itself a deep dive into the idea of testing ideas at a small scale before fully launching them. Understanding this process creates a much lower barrier to getting commitment by substantially reducing the consequences of failure.

The alternative, however, is not to shy away from decisions, but rather to create an orchestrated process by which the right people are engaged, including yourself.

But the deeper reason, which is true for many managers, is the perception that convening people outside of your own hierarchy is risky and difficult.

As a result, many managers unconsciously avoid taking this step. It stifles innovation, discourages candor, disdains dissenting opinions, and mutes the truth.

If what you seek is to neutralize your advantage by dumbing down the insights, observations and contributions of your team, then by all means default to consensus thinking. Then, members of their staffs communicate those same messages to their staffs, and so on until they have cascaded throughout much or all of the organization.

While the depth that is reached by cascading communication varies depending on the size and structure of an organization, in most cases it manages to descend two or three levels below the executive team. But what is important is that messages are being communicated consistently and quickly in a personal way.

Avoidance of Accountability The need to avoid interpersonal discomfort prevents team members from holding one another accountable. Once there is a clear sense of what is expected, teammates are enabled to hold one another accountable.

They have to be able to call peers out on performance or behaviors that may harm the team. The irony of holding back on this out of fear of discomfort is that eroding performance actually creates more resentment between people.

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Holding people accountable for results only is not enough, behaviors must be included — they often precede results issues. Once we achieve clarity and buy-in, it is then that we have to hold each other accountable for what we sign up to do, for high standards of performance and behavior.

The enemy of accountability is ambiguity.

  • Similarly, when we do something good, we assume it is due to our inherent capabilities;
  • Healthy conflict is the happy medium between artificial harmony and mean-spirited personal attacks;
  • A team member must be able to look at the results and know if they met the target;
  • Human beings are social animals.

Publishing clear goals and standards is vital to set expectations. Setting team goals and team rewards helps here as well. People are less likely to watch someone fail if the entire team has a stake. PDF Team Effectiveness Exercise — Gives team members a forum to provide one another with focused, direct, and actionable feedback about how their individual behavior can improve the performance of the team. This is recommended for teams that have already built some trust and have been together for at least a couple of months so they have observation-based opinions of one another.