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Burma road riot in the bahamas essay

  1. A modestly attended public meeting was held on May, 22 1942, after which the union and federation executives drafted a petition with the help of their attorney, A. And then they tried to reopen points that had already been agreed.
  2. A parked Coca-Cola truck provided convenient projectiles.
  3. And although Tribune publisher Sir Etienne Dupuch took a characteristically middle of the road approach, he was clear about the real cause. After consulting with his officials, the Duke confirmed the curfew and the ban on public meetings and added censorship of the press.
  4. Adderly, calling for a minimum wage of eight shillings a day. On Wednesday morning he met with several black leaders, one of whom, Dr.
  5. Over 30 drivers were prosecuted for assault and obstruction and given minor sentences by Magistrate Edward St George β€” an expatriate lawyer who later became the kingpin of Freeport. It was a share business deal.

Hire Writer They announced that the formation of the Federation of Labor would also represent skilled workers as well. A modestly attended public meeting was held on May, 22 1942, after which the union and federation executives drafted a petition with the help of their attorney, A.

Adderly, calling for a minimum wage of eight shillings a day. The administration showed little concern, Governor Windsor left for an appointment in Washington May 28th. The following day, the petition was delivered to the labor officer and passed on to the acting governor, Leslie Heape, who made a vague statement that an advisory board would be appointed to consider the question of wages on what was already being called the Project.

This assurance seems to have satisfied Rhodriguez and his fellow executives but not the workers.

Burma Road Riot in the Bahamas Essay

On Sunday, May 31st, a group of laborers at the Satellite Field went on strike. Karl Cambridge, one of the white supervisors, persuaded most to return to work. A small group remained behind, the leader was a young vocal Androsian named Leonard Green, also known as Storr, who had just joined the Project. When Storr attempted to call the other employees back to the strike, he was taken by the American field manager to the Pleasantville Corporation headquarters at Oakes Field, where under interrogation he asserted the obvious fact that it was impossible to live on four shillings a day.

Hughes convinced the upset workers that the problem will be dealt with as soon as possible and that everyone but the younger workers should go home. The situation got worse when a detachment of four police officers, under the command of a white Bahamian Captain Edward Sears, confronted Storr and his group, and tried to disperse them by force.

When the other workers noticed that Storr had a cut above his burma road riot in the bahamas essay, they presumed that it had been inflicted by Captain Edward Sears and the situation took a turn for the worst. A car was overturned and the crowd was broken up only when Sears drew his revolver and fired it in the air. Hughes was convinced that the workers could be calm downed.

Having obtained agreement with the Pleasantville operators over pay for rainy days, he persuaded Rhodriguez, Adderly, and Dr. Walker, who was a black candidate for New Providence South in the upcoming election, to talk to the workers early on Monday morning June 1st, 1942. At Oakes Field, where more than a thousand workers had gathered, Dr. The crowd got larger and more excited, and the presence of Captain Sears and a police detachment made the matters worse.

The crowd reached more than two thousand, and Sears sent for reinforcements. By that time, large groups of laborers, many equipped with sticks and machetes, had left the field and were marching north through the crowded Southern District towards downtown Nassau.

More volatile and disorganized than the traditional parades descending on Bay Street from Over the Hill, the laborers and their family supporters were still merely looking for someone in authority to whom to express their grievances and whom they might obtain some kind of satisfaction. This was misinterpreted as a threat that if they did not return docilely to work they would lose their jobs.

  1. Christie, Captain Sears and a number of others tried to convince the mob to go home but to no avail.
  2. From the disorderly meeting on the Southern Recreation Ground, the crowd fanned out, attacking and looting bars, particularly those owned by the white Bethell brothers.
  3. On Wednesday morning he met with several black leaders, one of whom, Dr.

Within minutes, the crowd exploded, raging up and down Bay Street, breaking windows and looting stores. A parked Coca-Cola truck provided convenient projectiles.

Burma Road Riot 1942 Essay

By noon, downtown was in shambles, though most of the horde had left the scene with their loot β€” cleared by the police and a detachment of Cameron Highlanders from garrison. The damage was not absolutely random; such shops as those owned by the Speaker of Assembly and the wife of one of the white Project supervisors were almost gutted, but the shoe store owned by Percy Christie, the white would-be labor organizer, was left untouched.

Particular targets were white-owned liquor stores, the stock of which fueled the aggression of rougher elements in the crowd. The reaction of the white administrators and Bay Street merchants was a mixture of shock and panic, while the colored middle class expressed shock and disowned the actions of the mob.

Mary Moseley, a white supervisor at the Project, walked the streets until she was chased indoors. Pritchard called Acting Governor Heape a fool and threatened that if nothing was done he would appeal directly to the military.

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In fact, Heape had already acted, calling those who were regarded as the representative of labor to Government House at 10: Adderly and Bert Cambridge claimed to have persuaded some of the crowd to return from Bay Street Over the Hill, but when they attempted to speak to a clamorous mob of two thousand gathered on the Southern Recreation Ground, their efforts were countervailing. From the disorderly meeting on the Southern Recreation Ground, the crowd fanned out, attacking and looting bars, particularly those owned by the white Bethell brothers.

  • The following day, the petition was delivered to the labor officer and passed on to the acting governor, Leslie Heape, who made a vague statement that an advisory board would be appointed to consider the question of wages on what was already being called the Project;
  • Mary Moseley, a white supervisor at the Project, walked the streets until she was chased indoors;
  • The following year saw abolition of the company vote, extension of the franchise to all men over 21, and the creation of four new parliamentary seats all of which were won by the PLP;
  • As soon as the curfew ended at 6 A;
  • After consulting with his officials, the Duke confirmed the curfew and the ban on public meetings and added censorship of the press;
  • A modestly attended public meeting was held on May, 22 1942, after which the union and federation executives drafted a petition with the help of their attorney, A.

When the commissioner of police, Reginald Erskine-Lindop, arrived with an armed detachment of police and soldiers, the crowd pelted them with stones and bottles. Though no general order to fire was given, shots were fired in the ensuing melee. One man, Roy Johnson, was killed instantly and six seriously wounded, of whom one, David Smith, died later that day in the hospital.

Forty rioters and several of the forces of law and order were treated for minor injuries. Even this was merely a quiet period. As soon as the curfew ended at 6 A. A looter shot by the shopkeeper was one of the other three fatalities following from the riots and curfew infringements. The Duke of Windsor flew back to Nassau as soon as he could after hearing news of the riots, arriving on the evening of Tuesday, June 2nd. He was preceded by a detachment of seventy-five U. Marines disguised as military police, seemingly to protect American military instillations by available to support local forces.

In the event, they were not required.

After consulting with his officials, the Duke confirmed the curfew and the ban on public meetings and added censorship of the press. On Wednesday morning he met with several black leaders, one of whom, Dr. Walker, using biblical terms, told him that ordinary people, aware of his reputation as a humanitarian, looked to him as their savior against oppression, inequality, and poverty. That evening, the Duke broadcast to the colony, urging calm and a return to work so that wage negotiations could proceed.

The following morning, Thursday, June 4th, more than half the workers reported for work on the Project, and by the end of the week work was proceeding as before. How to cite this page Choose cite format: