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A view from the bridge essay tension

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  • What kinda job, what do you mean?
  • In turn Marco protects his younger brother and shows Eddie that he knows what his intentions are and that he refuses to accept them;
  • This scene evokes tension in different ways;
  • Miller in Act 1 has verbally conveyed much of the sexual tension, however there are various occasions where sexual tensions is expressed through physical and visible Action On various occasions in Act 1 Miller has created tension by physical Actions and events rather than by any verbal dialogue.

Miller creates dramatic tension via the use of the characters Eddie and Catherine and their relationship together. Her parents have died so she now lives with them. Eddie and Catherine have a very close relationship and sometimes this can be a problem.

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In the beginning we see Catherine telling Eddie she has got a job. This does obviously not please Eddie right from the start. The first words of the narrator, Alfieri, make us think and almost expect there to be conflict during and throughout the play. Eddie is very protective of Catherine and the thought of her going out to work upsets him. At 17 Catherine is not old enough to go out on her own according to Eddie. Just in these first few pages we already start to feel an atmosphere of tension and it seems to be mounting.

With the imminent arrival of the illegal immigrants — Marco and Rodolfo — there is defiantly tension building. We can see that Eddie is obviously very territorial about his home and Catherine!

How Tension Is Created in the Play “a View from the Bridge? Essay

In the scene that closes Act one, Miller effectively creates tension. Miller begins the scene begins with a simple conversation about a recent trip to Africa which Marco and Rodolfo had undergone through work.

Essay Sample on Dramatic Tension in A view from the Bridge

However, tension is still created, regardless of the insignificance of the subject, by Eddie, who, from a simple glance at Catherine, appears to be sceptical about whether the trip actually took place: Throughout the beginning of the scene, Beatrice is stacking dishes and going in and out of the kitchen. Rodolfo then helps her: She and Rodolfo stack the remaining dishes.

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The audience is very mindful of this, and therefore the tension heightens. Eddie then undermines Beatrice with a mocking tone, in response to her comment about fishing from the beach: Laughing How you gonna catch sardines on a hook? Here, Miller successfully increases tension, as, although the subject matter is innocent, Eddie feels the need to mock Beatrice in order to feel a sense of superiority.

When other characters do not conform to his ideas of manliness it leads to conflict, as is the case with Rodolfo.

How does Miller build tension in Act 1 in A View from the Bridge?

Eddie says this in a rather aggressive tone, and increases conflict further by interrupting Rodolfo while he tries to reply. This, once more, increases the tension, as the audience is aware of the conflicted atmosphere in the room. Beatrice, who, so far has been trying to keep the peace, appears to be in agreement with Rodolfo, and, unusually, makes this clear to Eddie by saying: Eddie looks at her, aware of her criticising force. Again, the atmosphere heightens the tension. Miller then creates more conflict, with the conversation progressing further and Eddie stating his feelings with regards to the changes in Catherine since the arrival of Rodolfo.

Beatrice continues to side with Catherine and Rodolfo, by encouraging Catherine to defend herself when questioned about staying out late. However, Catherine responds with nothing more than a, one word answer, exposing her fear of standing up to her uncle.

How Does Arthur Miller Create Tension in a View from the Bridge

Eddie asks about the record, almost with a disgusted tone. Miller choreographs this climax well by writing that Rodolfo teaches Catherine to dance and allowing physical closeness. Again, another discussion starts up about the work of Marco and Rodolfo, and Marco mentions that his brother cooks on the boats. Which he does by saying: Eddie presses on the point further, by again saying: Eddie is challenging and mocking Rodolfo in a way that only Marco notices.

  • Eddie presses on the point further, by again saying;
  • Miller choreographs this climax well by writing that Rodolfo teaches Catherine to dance and allowing physical closeness;
  • In Act 1 this can once again be seen by the creation of tension between Eddie and Catherine;
  • With the imminent arrival of the illegal immigrants — Marco and Rodolfo — there is defiantly tension building;
  • Eddie initially felt masculine and superior; however any sort of superiority seems to be lost as Rodolpho can torture him with his relationship with Catherine.

In turn Marco protects his younger brother and shows Eddie that he knows what his intentions are and that he refuses to accept them. Marco, who will not allow any harm to his family, neutralises the one tactic, physical violence, Eddie can use on Rodolfo. Marco simply lifts a chair awkwardly above his head and holds it there, something, which Eddie is unable to do.

With his challenge to Eddie we see a new side of Marco that brings another moment of dramatic tension during the play.