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Why english is important for computer science student

Someone linked to a post and used the phrase: It's defintely phrased to get your attention and evoke opinions.

I don't agree with it, but I wanted to dig more into the concept. He wrote this email to me and I wanted to share it with you. He's was a programmer before he became a manager, and English is not his first language, so I thought it fitting.

  1. I also added emphasis in spots.
  2. Otherwise he cannot get a job as computers have invaded almost all the fields. I really applaud the effort being put in by Microsoft and other companies to make resources more available for everyone.
  3. He's was a programmer before he became a manager, and English is not his first language, so I thought it fitting.
  4. While you can and many people do write programs without understanding automata and algorithm design, a solid understanding of them both will make you a much better programmer, and save you a lot of time and trouble when you try to work out how to make something run faster.
  5. The list of countries goes on and on.

I also added emphasis in spots. Fabrice believes very strongly in the usefulness of translation and translated content and has an entire organization dedicated to it, so you can understand why he'd feel strongly about this.

  • It's defintely phrased to get your attention and evoke opinions;
  • What are the importances of computer to college students?
  • This anecdotal evidence is supported by our sales figures.

I began studying computer science and programming in 1985 as a freshman in a business school in France, my native country. At the timelocalized versions of programming tools were not available and I will always remember when I picked up that version of GW-Basic only to realize that it was all in English. Learning programming seemed already daunting, but doing it in a foreign language only increased my level of fear. Over 20 years have gone by and English does not feel quite as foreign to me anymore, but I cannot help but think that for billions of people around the world, taking on such a double challenge may not necessarily lead to the same outcome.

Over the past 17 years in the Developer Division at Microsoft, I have devoted a large portion of my time and energy why english is important for computer science student sure our products and technologies are available in as many languages as possible because I believe it is important to make them accessible to as many people as possible around the world.

During all these years, I have had the privilege of traveling to many countries around the world and I have talked to many of our customers, a number of which through interpreters.

I have met many brilliant developers out there whose English language skills were limited if not practically non-existent. This anecdotal evidence is supported by our sales figures.

The list of countries goes on and on. While it is true that a number of people overseas for whom English is not their native tongue will eventually learn and benefit from the vast amounts of technical content available in English, a greater number will not.

That is why we continue to expand the number of languages in which Developer Division products and technologies are localized into. Cost is obviously an important factor here, especially for smaller geographies. That is why we continue to invest in technologies such as machine translation, translation wikis and CLIP, and concepts such as crowdsourcing and community engagement to drive down costs and make these languages a reality for the millions of developers out there and aspiring developers that do not speak English.

By making our products available in all these languages, we also foster more community engagement in these languages, through blogs, forums, chat rooms, etc.

Here's some choice comments from the previous post: I truly do appreciate that Microsoft is trying to make an effort, and I believe that MSDN has had a vast improvement in usability the past year or so.

  • I don't agree with it, but I wanted to dig more into the concept;
  • I don't agree with it, but I wanted to dig more into the concept;
  • Most of the engineering graphs are also marked in English.

And the fact that MSFT are allowing community contribution is absolutely fantastic, but at least to me, the translation effort just seems a bit unnecessary. And as Scott points out, the side-by-side translation feature would actually be a great way for learning english.

That's like saying "a musician who is deaf is not a musician" patently untrue and ridiculous. However and specially in Latin America this is still a long term goal. I really applaud the effort being put in by Microsoft and other companies to make resources more available for everyone.

Culture & humanities

I have tried developing on a Swedish version of XP but trying to search for those error messages doesn't work. Can't say i agree with the statement "If you don't know English, you're not a programmer" but it does make life easier.

  1. While it is true that a number of people overseas for whom English is not their native tongue will eventually learn and benefit from the vast amounts of technical content available in English, a greater number will not.
  2. Can you be an awesome programmer and speak little or NO English?
  3. By making our products available in all these languages, we also foster more community engagement in these languages, through blogs, forums, chat rooms, etc. It's defintely phrased to get your attention and evoke opinions.

Is learning English the 1 thing a Programmer should do after learning to type? Can you be an awesome programmer and speak little or NO English? He is a failed stand-up comic, a cornrower, and a book author.