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The struggles of the albanians in girl of kosovo a book by alice mead

Divide your class into six groups, and ask each group to research one of the six republics that made up Yugoslavia, as listed in the introduction. Ask each group to learn their region's location, its major cities and products, its history, and its present status. Once your students have given the background of all six regions, further discuss the events of the 1990s and President Milosevic.

Who benefited from his rule? Who suffered, and why were they made to suffer? What do they think the future of this region is? Ask your students to think about the different settings in Girl of Kosovo. Where does Zana feel happy and safe? Which settings fill her with misery and fear? Do any of the settings in the book carry both positive and negative associations?

Ask your students to explain why, based on their reading and research, the ethnic Albanians and Serbs both feel that Kosovo should be theirs.

Girl of Kosovo

Why don't the Albanians simply move to Albania? Why don't the Serbs just agree to share the land?

  1. Where do their sympathies lie? My next stop is Albania.
  2. This is part of my daughter's Adriatic South Mission so she might serve in Kosovo though I'd be happy if she stayed in Albania.
  3. Other Books by Alice Mead Junebug. Where does Zana feel happy and safe?

Challenge your students to think of similar examples both in current world events and in American history. Finish the exercise with a journal or creative writing exercise. Do your students feel basically safe at home? Why or why not? How would they feel if an armed, hostile group occupied their community?

  1. Why don't the Albanians simply move to Albania? This is part of my daughter's Adriatic South Mission so she might serve in Kosovo though I'd be happy if she stayed in Albania.
  2. Why don't the Serbs just agree to share the land?
  3. Why or why not?
  4. Where does Zana feel happy and safe? Do any of the settings in the book carry both positive and negative associations?
  5. How would they feel if an armed, hostile group occupied their community? Finally, bring the discussion to a close by asking your students to imagine how peace might finally come to the Balkans.

A Matter of Perspective Start by asking your students what the narrative perspective is in Girl of Kosovo. Once they have provided that it is the first-person-limited perspective, ask them to brainstorm how the story might have been different if it had been told in a different perspective. How would the narrative change if it were told from the third-person-omniscient perspective?

How would it be different if it were told by another character's first-person-limited perspective? Based on clues from the book, discuss the perspectives and beliefs that the other characters in the book have towards the events that take place in Kosovo.

Ask your students what their own opinions are about the events described in Girl of Kosovo. Where do their sympathies lie? Can they make any absolute judgments about right and wrong in this story? Challenge them to play devil's advocate to their own beliefs. Explain the phrase devil's advocate — arguing the less-accepted viewpoint. Finally, bring the discussion to a close by asking your students to imagine how peace might finally come to the Balkans.

How do the opinions of the characters in Girl of Kosovo prevent the peace process? What would need to change? Discussion Question What occurred to the Albanians in Kosovo is an example of ethnic cleansing.

Girl of Kosovo Discussion Guide

Can your students think of other historically similar situations? This discussion will require research books, articles, the Internet. Some answers may include: Does history repeat itself? Meet a Young Immigrant Meet Vedron.

A Child's Life in Sarajevo by Zlata Filipovic Zlata's diary begins like a typical 11-year-old, with birthday parties, piano lessons, school stories, and a happy life with friends and family.

But Zlata's life completely changes as her home city of Sarajevo is destroyed by war. She writes about hiding during bombings, the death of friends, and constant fear and hunger, as well as her hatred of this terrible war. Adem's Cross by Alice Mead The author of Girl of Kosovo has spent a lot of time working with children in Kosovo, and this is another story based on her experiences there. The Albanians in Kosovo are heavily persecuted, but 14-year-old Adem tries to live a normal life.

But when his sister is gunned down by Serbians after reading a protest poem, Adem is wracked with guilt as he struggles to understand why people hate and abuse each other. Other Books by Alice Mead Junebug.