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Specifics heat capacity used method of mixtures

To raise the temperature of a body from a given initial temperature T1 to a final temperature T2 requires a total quantity of heat which depends on the mass of the body, the specific heat of the material of which the body is composed, and the temperature difference. The process of measuring quantities of heat is called calorimetry. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the specific heat of one or more metals by the method of mixtures.

This is true provided no heat is gained from or lost to the surroundings. The vessel in which the heat interchange takes place is called the calorimeter. The product of the mass of the calorimeter and its specific heat is called its water equivalent. The water equivalent of a body is the is the mass of water which would require the same amount of heat as the body in order to raise the temperature through one degree Centigrade.

  1. Remove the phenolic cover and pour a measured amount of cold water into the assembled calorimeter. Stir the water and take the temperature reading every 10 minutes.
  2. Weigh it in the beaker and weigh the beaker again after you have poured the water out.
  3. Stir the water and take the temperature reading every 10 minutes.
  4. The heat absorbed by the water, calorimeter, and stirrer is equal to the heat lost by the metal. The initial temperature of the cold water should be as much below room temperature as the equilibrium temperature will be above it, so as to balance out errors due to losses of heat by radiation.

The equilibrium temperature is then measured. The heat absorbed by the water, calorimeter, and stirrer is equal to the heat lost by the metal. The initial temperature of the cold water should be as much below room temperature as the equilibrium temperature will be above it, so as to balance out errors due to losses of heat by radiation.

This experiment have as goal the calculation of the specific heat of a substance. In order to arrive at this calculation it is necessary to determine the specific heat of the calorimeter, since its specific heat capacity must be removed from the calculations for each experiment.

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Some heat energy is also lost to the air outside of the calorimeter system through the holes and to the thermometer that is used to take the measurements. We will take advantage of the standard specific heat of water to calibrate the calorimeter and all its parts together to arrive at a calorimeter constant that will be useful for our calculations. The constant represents the portion of heat transfer in the calorimeter system that does not include the water that we use for calibration.

Your lab station should be provided with: Remove the phenolic cover and pour a measured amount of cold water into the assembled calorimeter. Weigh it in the beaker and weigh the beaker again after you have poured the water out.

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The difference is the measured amount of cold water that you need. Wait a couple of minutes and take the temperature of the mass of water. Remove the water from its heat source and stir it for a couple of minutes. Stir the water and take the temperature reading every 10 minutes. It is not necessary to remove the cover to do this.

Record the highest temperature to the nearest two-tenths of a degree. Once you have determined the specific heat of the calorimeter with which you are working, you can determine the specific heat of the metal. To measure the specific heat of the metal, pour cold water from the sink temperature into the calorimeter until it is half-filled, and record the stabilized temperature reading of the water. Quickly if you are not quick enough the experimental results will erroneous transfer the aluminum sphere from the hot water bath to the cold water in the calorimeter without splashing any water.

Use the method of mixtures to find out the specific heat capacity of a mass of brass.

Stir the water and record the equilibrium temperature shortly after. Repeat the experiment another time to obtain a mean value. Dry the sphere thoroughly on paper toweling for each repeat experiment. Calculate Ccal from the data recorded in Table 1, then; using the average for the two experimental results, calculate the calorimeter constant.

You will have to use Equation 1 with M standing for the hot water mass, mw for the cold water mass, and c equals cw. Using the calorimeter constant, the three temperature readings, and the mass of the cold water and aluminum sample, calculate the specific heat of the aluminum use Equation 1 with the parameters as described below this equation.