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List of mfa programs in creative writing

Tweet I recently left a teaching position in a master of fine arts creative-writing program. I had a handful of students whose work changed my life. The vast majority of my students were hardworking, thoughtful people devoted to improving their craft despite having nothing interesting to express and no interesting way to express it. My hope for them was that they would become better readers.

  • For more details, speak with your preferred mfa creative writing program about their workshopping process;
  • And, you could still receive valuable feedback from peers and professors via email or online forums;
  • Samples could include things like completed novel chapters, poems, or stage plays;
  • Program length may vary by school and enrollment;
  • The MFA Index offers enough information about the genre tracks, location, size, amount of available funding, cost of living, and residency requirements for you to determine whether you want to do additional research on a program, gathering the details that matter the most to you;
  • Their complaints are an insult to the writers who managed to produce great work under far more difficult conditions than the 21st-century MFA student.

And then there were students whose work was so awful that it literally put me to sleep. Here are some things I learned from these experiences. Writers are born with talent. Either you have a propensity for creative expression or you don't.

Some people have more talent than others. That's not to say that someone with minimal talent can't work her ass off and maximize it and write something great, or that a writer born with great talent can't squander it.

It's simply that writers are not all born equal. The MFA student who is the Real Deal is exceedingly rare, and nothing excites a faculty adviser more than discovering one.

Things I Can Say About MFA Writing Programs Now That I No Longer Teach in One

I can count my Real Deal students on one hand, with fingers to spare. If you didn't decide to take writing seriously by the time you were a teenager, you're probably not going to make it.

There are notable exceptions to this rule, Haruki Murakami being one.

The Basics of Creative Writing Graduate Programs

But for most people, deciding to begin pursuing creative writing in one's 30s or 40s is probably too late. Being a writer means developing a lifelong intimacy with language. You have to be crazy about books as a kid to establish the neural architecture required to write one.

  • Full time students could potentially earn a Graduate Certificate in Creative Writing in 1 year, although program lengths vary;
  • Classes could touch on the following topics;
  • Many programs cannot guarantee full funding for all students, as funding often depends on university budgets that change unpredictably each year;
  • The level of funding a program offers is of particular interest to many prospective students, and rightly so;
  • In comparison, creative writing dissertations usually require students to submit long-form works.

If you complain about not having time to write, please do us both a favor and drop out. My experience tells me this: Students who ask a lot of questions about time management, blow deadlines, and whine about how complicated their lives are should just give up and do something else. Their complaints are an insult to the writers who managed to produce great work under far more difficult conditions than the 21st-century MFA student. On a related note: Students who ask if they're "real writers," simply by asking that question, prove that they are not.

If you aren't a serious reader, don't expect anyone to read what you write. Without exception, my best students were the ones who read the hardest books I could assign and asked for more. One student, having finished his assigned books early, asked me to assign him three big novels for the period between semesters. Infinite Jest, 2666, and Gravity's Rainbow, I told him, almost as a joke.

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He read all three and submitted an extra-credit essay, too. That guy was the Real Deal. Conversely, I've had students ask if I could assign shorter books, or—without a trace of embarrassment—say they weren't into "the classics" as if "the classics" was some single, aesthetically consistent genre. Students who claimed to enjoy "all sorts" of books were invariably the ones with the most limited taste. One student, upon reading The Great Gatsby for the first time!

Yes, a graduate student! No one cares about your problems if you're a shitty writer. I worked with a number of students writing memoirs. One of my Real Deal students wrote a memoir that actually made me cry. He was a rare exception. For the most part, MFA students who choose to write memoirs are narcissists using the genre as therapy.

  1. This may make it more accessible to a wide array of students so that they can begin to hone their craft before moving on to another graduate program.
  2. On a related note. Workshop requirements may differ by school.
  3. Graduate creative writing schools provide the opportunity to develop your work alongside your peers and mentors.
  4. Graduate creative writing schools provide the opportunity to develop your work alongside your peers and mentors. Workshop requirements may differ by school.
  5. Those seven years spent in obscurity, with no attempt to share my work with anyone, were my training, and they are what allowed me to eventually write books that got published.

They want someone to feel sorry for them, and they believe that the supposed candor of their reflective essay excuses its technical faults. Just because you were abused as a child does not make your inability to stick with the same verb tense for more than two sentences any more bearable.

In fact, having to slog through 500 pages of your error-riddled student memoir makes me wish you had suffered more. You don't need my help to get published.

  • That's why I advise anyone serious about writing books to spend at least a few years keeping it secret;
  • Depending on your future responsibilities, you could plan your semesters accordingly;
  • I worked with a number of students writing memoirs.

When I was working on my MFA between 1997 and 1999, I understood that if I wanted any of the work I was doing to ever be published, I'd better listen to my faculty advisers. MFA programs of that era were useful from a professional development standpoint—I still think about a lecture the poet Jason Shinder gave at Bennington College that was full of tremendously helpful career advice I use to this day.

Anyone who claims to have useful information about the publishing industry is lying to you, because nobody knows what the hell is happening. My advice is for writers to reject the old models and take over the production of their own and each other's work as much as possible.

2018 MFA Index: A Guide to More Than 200 Programs

It's not important that people think you're smart. After eight years of teaching at the graduate level, I grew increasingly intolerant of writing designed to make the writer look smart, clever, or edgy.

I know this work when I see it; I've written a fair amount of it myself. But writing that's motivated by the desire to give the reader a pleasurable experience really is best. Those who didn't get it were stuck on the notion that their writing was a tool designed to procure my validation. The funny thing is, if you can put your ego on the back burner and focus on giving someone a wonderful reading experience, that's the cleverest writing.

Graduate Creative Writing Programs

It's important to woodshed. Occasionally my students asked me about how I got published after I got my MFA, and the answer usually disappointed them. After I received my degree in 1999, I spent seven years writing work that no one has ever read—two novels and a book's worth of stories totaling about 1,500 final draft pages.

These unread pages are my most important work because they're where I applied what I'd learned from my workshops and the books I read, one sentence at a time. Those seven years spent in obscurity, with no attempt to share my work with anyone, were my training, and they are what allowed me to eventually write books that got published. We've been trained to turn to our phones to inform our followers of our somewhat witty observations.

I think the instant validation of our apps is an enemy to producing the kind of writing that takes years to complete. That's why I advise anyone serious about writing books to spend at least a few years keeping it secret.

If you're able to continue writing while embracing the assumption that no one will ever read your work, it will reward you in ways you never imagined.

MFA Programs Database

Ryan Boudinot is executive director of Seattle City of Literature.