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Huckleberry finn life on shore and on river

October 24, 2004

Huckleberry Finn and Jim are without a doubt the happiest and most a peace when floating down the river on their raft. However, the river has a much deeper meaning than just a compilation of water. It almost goes to an extent of having its own personality and character traits.

  • He is showing us that we have the strength inside to stand on our own and make decisions for ourselves;
  • The river becomes the place where freedom is felt for Huck and Jim on a grand scale;
  • They symbolise freedom, serenity and peace, and provide an environment without human interference.

The river offers a place for the two characters, Huck and Jim, to escape from everybody and even everything in society and leaves them with a feeling of ease. In the middle section of Huckleberry Finn, the river takes on more of a concrete meaning and will be discussed more so in the paragraphs that follows.

Before investigating exactly the roles that the river played in this section of the novel, I decided to actually get a dictionary definition of river before continuing. However, I believe this may sound very simply but it may indeed clear up controversies or confusions found later on in the presentation. The definition of a river is simply a natural wide flow of fresh water across the land into the sea, a lake, or another river.

The river in this context shows a more peaceful setting than that of society. As the author shows, the river and its society is calm and the land and its society is troublesome in a variety of different aspects. I found another quote rather similar and close in context to the first that shows exactly the river in regards to a peaceful and serene aspect.

You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft. As stated in the quotation, the river was a home where Huckleberry finn life on shore and on river and Huck could relax, feel comfortable, and generally be at ease.

  1. She is also one of the characters that follow the discriminatory restrictions in her society.
  2. In reading this quotation, you can just literally sense the flowing of the river and the peaceful sounds that were outlined.
  3. It makes them forget the suffering inside society and how bad people deal with each other.
  4. Huck sees nature as the best way to leave society and civilisation and his journey down the river confirms this view of nature in the novel. He is asking himself if it is more right to turn Jim in or to help in his escape.
  5. Do you see any other areas of symbolism in regards to the river that is taken on throughout the novel? Symbols of Natural Forces in Huckleberry Finn Twain uses natural environments and the forces of nature as symbols in his novel.

This was very easy to comprehend as a reader but to envision a home as the river or even a raft on a river does not necessarily coincide with ideals of a picturesque home. In Chapter 19we continue to view exactly why Huck felt the river was so peaceful through the various descriptions offered about by the author.

The author in this chapter seems to make his words flow like a river and generally captivate the audience to a point in which they feel the calmness of the river as well. In reading this quotation, you can just literally sense the flowing of the river and the peaceful sounds that were outlined.

This not only outlines the calmness of nature but the ability for freedom. The freedom is portrayed in the ability to do as one pleases when and even wherever they decide to do so. The most obvious is that because the river was so peaceful and calm that it led to their freedom to do as they please without the barriers given by society on land.

  1. Life on Land At the start of the novel, we find the protagonist and the narrator Huck telling us that he does not like being adopted in the household of the Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson.
  2. Whenever Huck goes to shore he eventually seeks the refuge of the raft and the river. Nature itself has a strong power to delimit their fancies of the society and its people as one of the advantages of the nature.
  3. At the same time, society remains at the mercy of nature. The ending simply shows the changes Huck has gone through during his voyage to the boyish attitude him and Tom shared at the beginning of the novel.
  4. Miss Watson, the first character, is displayed as a hypocrite by Huck "Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. Not so that we judge the world but so we can stand up for what is right.

However, the characters have one escape that being the Mississippi River. The river is a quiet and peaceful place where Huck and Jim can revert to any time to examine any predicament they might find themselves in.

The natural flow of the river and its calmness causes deep thoughts, which shows how unnatural the collective thought of society can be. We actually see Huck grow up having the river as a place for solitude and thought, where he can participate at times and other times sit back and watch.

The ideas of nature, peace, and freedom, are presented in the form of the river where Huck and Jim go to think.

  • The Grangerfords and the Shepherdsons both go to the same Church;
  • This is shown in the river scene where he is lying beside the river and looking for the star and admiring the scenes of the river;
  • International Journal of Literature and Arts;
  • The author in this chapter seems to make his words flow like a river and generally captivate the audience to a point in which they feel the calmness of the river as well;
  • Nature relates to anything in the novel that is free;
  • Twain, through Huck, gives us the chance to see all the things in the world as they really are.

Huckleberry Finn is actually struggling to find himself in regards to his freedom to be an individual created by his own morals and not societies and Jim is essentially looking for freedom from slavery.

It is essentially through the river that we see each character grow and realize the capability they each possess. Can you as an audience find any other examples of when the river was used as a symbolism of peace, calmness, or freedom for the characters? Do you see any other areas of symbolism in regards to the river that is taken on throughout the novel?

Huckleberry finn life on shore and on river

What are some other areas of symbolism mentioned throughout the novel that really struck your attention? Do you agree that the river is a symbolism of especially freedom? If not, what do you think the author is trying to use the river as throughout the novel? Posted by MelissaHagg at October 24, 2004 7: