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Fluid and electrolyte case studies for nursing students

Understanding Electrolytes: 15 Interactive Teaching Cases

Quote from Halcyonn Esme, thank you for your very informative post. You mentioned that a patient with edema may experience hypernatremia, but you also mentioned that a patient who consumes large amounts of fluids may experience hyponatremia. In my mind, excess fluid is excess fluid, so let me attempt to understand this. Conversely, if a patient consumes excess amounts of fluid they may experience hyponatremia because they have essentially diluted themselves eg.

Neonatal Advanced Practice Nursing

I suppose I'm getting caught up in the fact that in both cases the patient has extra fluid on board, but ends up with two different lab values. Does this make sense? Most water intoxication is caused by hyponatremia, an overdilution of sodium in the blood plasma, which in turn causes an osmotic shift of water from extracellular fluid outside of cells to intracellular fluid within cells. The cells swell as a result of changes in osmotic pressure and may cease to function.

  • The book has pre and post test and in between it has the info;
  • This publication predates our implementation of the Educational Summary Report in 2016 and thus displays a different format than newer publications;
  • It has been tested on second-year medical students at our institution during their internal medicine rotation;
  • This resource is extremely effective;
  • In my mind, excess fluid is excess fluid, so let me attempt to understand this.

When this occurs in the cells of the central nervous system and brain, water intoxication is the result. Feb 12, '14 Occupation: I passed that test with a 88. The book has pre and post test and in between it has the info.

NCLEX Practice Exam Questions for Fluids & Electrolytes

It breaks down the info perfectly. I recommend all the entire series for studying throughout nursing school. My original reply should have said hypervolemia instead of hypovolemia. Anyway, my take away from that is water will move to dilute the solute. In this case, sodium.

  1. I suppose I'm getting caught up in the fact that in both cases the patient has extra fluid on board, but ends up with two different lab values.
  2. Bellini also serves as a reviewer for several journals and is a member of the editorial advisory board for Nursing for Women's Health, an Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses journal.
  3. Most water intoxication is caused by hyponatremia, an overdilution of sodium in the blood plasma, which in turn causes an osmotic shift of water from extracellular fluid outside of cells to intracellular fluid within cells.
  4. Her research interests include perinatal safety, extremely low-birth-weight infants, neonatal abstinence syndrome, and the management of high-risk newborns in the delivery room.
  5. Anyway, my take away from that is water will move to dilute the solute.

An intake of too much fluid causes the dilution of the blood plasma. Treatment for this condition would be diuretics?

Still kinda hung up on the concept of edema related hypernatremia. Perhaps looking at interventions will help it make sense. The Hurst review that was posted at the top?