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A personal view on beliefs and choices

Dominant values Dominant values are those that are widely shared amongst a group, community or culture. They are passed on through sources such as the media, institutions, religious organisations or family, but remember what is considered dominant in one culture or society will vary to the next.

Using the sources listed above, some of your values could be: It is important that you develop an awareness of what you value, as these values will be important in informing your relationships with clients, co—workers and employers. The following is a list of common dominant values in Australian society. Tick the values that apply to you and then select the ten most important values you ticked and rank them. What is important here is your ability to be able to identify the values that are important to you.

It is important to be conscious of our values.

  1. Do I know people from a different race to me? My Christian friends said that love is built into each of us, and that if we didn't love, it was our choice.
  2. What other cultures interest me? The aim of this activity is to make you aware of issues that could arise in the workplace and the differing values workers can have.
  3. If you are able to accept your clients, with whatever values they have, you may well find that as time passes they move closer to you in their beliefs.

This knowledge helps us to: It is important to not only have a knowledge of your value system, but to understand that your values underpin your beliefs and beliefs underpin behaviour. How we behave is a reflection of our beliefs and our beliefs are a reflection of our values. Exploring your values We are all influenced in varying degrees by the values of our family, culture, religion, education and social group.

Wherever our values come from they make us the unique person we are today! Answer the following and then think about what it tells you about yourself, where your values have come from and how people with different backgrounds and life experiences would answer these questions. There are no right or wrong answers—just answer honestly and be willing to explore and reflect upon your own values.

Race With what race do I identify? Do I know people from a different race to me? Do I believe people from different races should live together? What would life be like if my skin colour was different? What do I think about marriages and relationships between people from different races?

Gender How many friends do I have from the opposite sex? If I was a different gender how might life be different?

Religion What is my religion? Do I believe in it? Are most people in my community from this religion? How does my religion influence my life? Culture What culture do I identify with? What do I like and dislike about my culture and traditions? What other cultures interest me? Do I like learning about them? Language What is my first language? What other languages do I speak? Who should decide what language people should speak?

General What political party do I support? Do I believe in the death penalty?

Is Belief Really a Choice?

What are my views on abortion? What are my views on homosexuality? What are my views about illegal drugs? What are my view about voluntary euthanasia? Reflect on your answers about where your values have come from. What did this activity tell you about your values? Why have you decided to become a worker in the CSI? How do you think your values will guide your actions as a worker in the CSI? The aim of this activity is to make you aware of issues that could arise in the workplace and the differing values workers can have.

There are no right or wrong answers, so when completing this activity try to be as honest as you can. Values clarification Read the following scenarios and rate your reactions by ticking the box which best defines your reaction. Scenario 1 Stan and Russell have become good friends in the residential care facility. Stan usually buys the magazines, but one month Stan did a personal view on beliefs and choices come into the hostel for care as he usually did.

Russell wanted some new pornos to read so he asked Penny the care worker to buy him some magazines.

She agreed and brought some for him. What do you think about Penny doing this for Russell? I think this is not okay. I think this is okay. Scenario 2 Wayne is a 49 year old volunteer at an aged care home.

He is an Anglo-Australian, with a disability. He works with Anh, the recreation officer. She Vietnamese and is 20 years old. Wayne and Anh have been going out together and Wayne has told Anh that he loves her.

How do you feel about Anh and Wayne being partners? Rate your feeling according to their ages: Rate your feeling according to their cultural backgrounds: Rate your feeling according to the fact they work together: Scenario 3 Dawn is a 50 year old woman with Downs Syndrome, and is a resident at a residential aged care facility.

She masturbates in the common lounge area at the facility. She needs to be shown a private place to do this and it is your role to take her to a private room, next time she is masturbating. How do you feel about this?

Rate your response according to the factor of Dawn masturbating: Rate your response according to the factor of your role as a worker assisting her in this situation. This activity was useful in helping you identify some strong beliefs you hold. It is good for you to be able to reflect on these and think how they might impact on your role as a care worker.

For example, if you think that all older people and people with disabilities have a right to express their sexuality, regardless of the way they choose do that, you will want to ensure their privacy and dignity is respected.

Remember, clients have a right to receive a professional service regardless of the attitudes, beliefs and values they hold. After answering the questions, you might a personal view on beliefs and choices it useful to revisit your answers and identify where your attitudes have come from.

This will help in preventing your personal attitudes from impacting on the way you work with clients.

The Bible Teaches We Can Choose Our Beliefs

What is a belief? Beliefs come from real experiences but often we forget that the original experience is not the same as what is happening in life now. Our values and beliefs affect the quality of our work and all our relationships because what you believe is what you experience. We tend to think that our beliefs are based on reality, but it is our beliefs that govern our experiences.

The beliefs that we hold are an important part of our identity. They may be religious, cultural or moral.

Our Freedom to Choose Belief

Beliefs are precious because they reflect who we are and how we live our lives. These stereotypes could affect the way you interact and work with clients. If you make assumptions as a worker then you are denying clients their rights, respect and dignity. As a worker this would be regarded as a breach in your duty of care towards clients. The need for older people and people with disabilities to express their sexuality does not necessarily diminish over time.

The desire for intimacy can in fact intensify. The way people choose to express their sexuality may change over time in a variety of ways. What is an attitude? An attitude is a belief about something. The attitudes that we feel very strongly about are usually called values.

Other attitudes are not so important and are more like opinions. Attitudes will always have a positive and negative element and when you hold an attitude you will have a tendency to behave in a certain way toward that person or object.

Personal values, belief and attitudes

You will need to be aware of your own personal values, beliefs and attitudes and how they might impact on your work. It is important to consider the mapping of your own life — what have been some significant events that have shaped you, what qualities you admire in yourself and others, what beliefs are important to you, what you value and so on. Some examples of these may be personal features such as strength of character, helping people, respect, honesty, wealth, success, health etc.

What we believe are important qualities, or what qualities we admire in ourselves and others, generally reflect our life experiences and the values which we established in our early years through the influence of family, teachers, friends, religion, our culture, our education.

Given that all of us have differences which have been shaped by our life experiences, we can understand that we will all have different sets of values and beliefs. We do not all think about issues in the same way! To work effectively it is critical to understand your own values and beliefs and to understand the importance of not allowing them to affect the way in which you work with clients.