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Why schools should get rid of strict dress codes

This is unfortunate, not necessarily because these are bad resting places for an argument over policy, but more that the purpose of this forum is to focus on the Constitution. The other arguments given are perfectly valid for answering the question of whether we should have a dress code. However, the first question is the one of can we even have a dress code, Constitutionally, in the first place?

Therefore, my argument will rest squarely on the text and interpretation of this important document. Yes, dress codes are absolutely necessary and even Constitutionally allowed.

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I will base my argument off of two key texts in the Constitution: Any powers not delegated to the Federal Government are reserved to the States or the people.

Education is not delegated to the Federal Government. Therefore, the Federal Government may not regulate education. The acting definition is essentially the same as the one given by the Supreme Court in United States v.

This landmark case opened the floodgates for Federal Spending, allowing the Federal government to spend money on things that are outside the scope of the delegated powers in Article I. This is exactly how the Federal government regulates education. The states are offered a grant of money from Washington, but only allowed to take this money if they comply with certain regulations.

There are certain restrictions on what they can regulate, but they currently regulate much of state education in this way. Thus, public schools are essentially regulated by the Federal government and are therefore under the Constitution.

Students should be allowed to express themselves according to the First Amendment, right? The Supreme Court has ruled, in such cases as Miller v.

  1. Any powers not delegated to the Federal Government are reserved to the States or the people.
  2. The Supreme Court has ruled, in such cases as Miller v. Students should be allowed to express themselves according to the First Amendment, right?
  3. Therefore, my argument will rest squarely on the text and interpretation of this important document.

California, that obscene speech is unprotected by the First Amendment and may be banned. Thus, a dress code is a perfectly Constitutional restriction on speech. What do we have at the end of all this? The fact that the schools are perfectly in the right to establish dress codes. The other arguments on this site address the next question of whether we should or should not have one; I hold the former position. The Constitution does not protect obscenity, and the Bible—the foundation, one could argue, of the Constitution in many ways—condemns it.

The truth is, whether one wants to believe it or not, men are attracted to women. And it will not stop; this is the way it was created, and in marriage, it is holy and right. But outside of that, it is immoral and sinful, and dress codes are a perfectly Constitutional way of addressing that.