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Why pakistan is lagging behind in technology in comparison with technology tigers

Individual usage 7 indicators 7. Business usage 6 indicators 8. Government usage 3 indicators D. Economic impacts 4 indicators 10. Social impacts 4 indicators The computation of the overall NRI score is based on successive aggregations of scores: The appendix of Chapter 1. About half of the individual indicators used in the NRI are sourced from international organizations. The Survey is used to measure concepts that are qualitative in nature or for which internationally comparable statistics are not available for enough countries.

The 2014 edition of the Survey was completed by over 13,000 business executives. Networked Readiness Index 2015: Results overview Tables 1—5 in Chapter 1. Not unexpectedly, advanced economies are better than developing ones at leveraging ICTs.

  • A comparative study of broadband in the introduction of xdsl technology declare they were lagging behind asian tigers and thus set the;
  • Unlike Singapore, Hong Kong has missed and continues to shun pro-growth integration opportunities In 1960, Hong Kong, the first dragon to begin the catch-up, led the group in average living standards; it lagged far behind both the US and Japan, and was followed by Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea;
  • Because healthcare is increasingly out-of-pocket, many patients also face rising costs, while lack of access to primary care exacerbates the situation in emerging economies;
  • Unlike Singapore, Hong Kong has missed and continues to shun pro-growth integration opportunities In 1960, Hong Kong, the first dragon to begin the catch-up, led the group in average living standards; it lagged far behind both the US and Japan, and was followed by Singapore, Taiwan and South Korea;
  • By improving access to services, enhancing connectivity, creating business and employment opportunities, and changing the ways people communicate, interact, and engage among themselves and with their governments, ICTs can transform our world.

High-income economies dominate, taking the first 31 places in the overall NRI rankings. The performance of countries largely mirrors their position on the development ladder: Forty-four of the 50 high-income economies covered rank in the top 50, which otherwise features six upper-middle-income countries, the highest-ranked being Malaysia at 32nd place.

At the bottom of the rankings, 26 of the 30 worst-performing countries are low-income or lower-middle-income countries. Singapore tops the rankings this year, and even though this bumps Finland to 2nd place, seven of the top 10 this year are European. As a result, only Singapore represents the Asian Tigers in the top 10. Besides Singapore and Japan, the United States stable at 7th is the only other non-European country in this group.

Europe is home to some of the best connected and most innovation-driven economies in the world. In particular, the Nordics—Finland 2ndSweden 3rdNorway 5thDenmark 15thand Iceland 19th —continue to perform well.

Indeed, these five countries have featured in the top 20 of every edition since 2012. The group performance of Western European countries is also strong. The Netherlands 4thSwitzerland 6ththe United Kingdom 8thand Luxembourg 9th all appear in the top 10. Ireland 25th has been stable since 2012, and France 26th —which has lost three places since 2012—closes the group in the subregion. In Southern Europe, Portugal 28th, up fiveItaly 55th, up threeand Greece 66th, up eight improve significantly from last year on the back of major improvements in government usage, whereas Malta 29thSpain 34thand Cyprus 36th, up one remain quite stable.

Thanks to the strong performance of Estonia 22nd and the steady rise of Latvia 33rd, up sixwhich is catching up to Lithuania 31stthe Baltic countries are slowly but surely bridging the gap with the Nordics—a remarkable achievement for the three former Soviet Republics. These countries are breaking away from what was once a fairly homogenous group of Eastern European countries that have joined the European Union EU since 2004: Slovenia 37th, down onethe Czech Republic 43rd, down oneHungary 53rd, down sixCroatia 54th, down eightand the Slovak Republic 59th, no change are either stable or losing ground.

The divide within the Middle East, North Africa, and Pakistan region is the largest among all regions.

All owe their success to a very strong commitment to ICT development by their respective governments. In the rest of the region, only Jordan 52nd features in the top half of the rankings.

Morocco follows at a middling 78th, but is the country that has improved the most up 21 places over the past year. Emerging and developing Asia offers strong contrasts, too. Malaysia 32nd is the only country featured in the top 60 of the NRI; two-thirds of the countries from the region appear in the bottom half of the rankings.

Mongolia 61stSri Lanka 65thand Thailand 67th lag some 30 places behind Malaysia. China is stable in 62nd position, while India continues its fall, dropping a further six to 89th place. Overall, though, trends are encouraging: In particular, Costa Rica 49th, up why pakistan is lagging behind in technology in comparison with technology tigers since 2012Panama 51st, up sixEl Salvador 80th, up 23Peru 90th, up 16and Bolivia 111th, up 16 have posted some of the largest score gains worldwide since 2012.

The performance of sub-Saharan Africa is particularly disappointing: The only exception is Mauritius, at 45th. This country has progressed three places since last year and eight since 2012. Among the large economies of the region, Nigeria drops seven places to 119th. South Africa drops five to 75th—it is now third in the region behind Mauritius and Seychelles 74th. In contrast, Kenya 86th, up six has been slowly improving since 2012. Key messages Among the many insights that emerge from the NRI results, five stand out because of their important policy implications.

The transformative power of ICTs. As a general-purpose technology, the impact of ICTs extends well beyond productivity gains. ICTs are vectors of economic and social transformation. By improving access to services, enhancing connectivity, creating business and employment opportunities, and changing the ways people communicate, interact, and engage among themselves and with their governments, ICTs can transform our world.

Yet only widespread and systematic use of ICTs by all stakeholders—individuals, businesses, and government—can trigger such transformation.

  • Its future is overshadowed by political angst;
  • In the case of Brazil, broadband seems to be yielding higher productivity gains for less-developed regions;
  • In other words, big data analytics has created a tipping point, shifting us from a world in which we think we know how to elevate the human condition into a world in which we know how to do this and we can prove it.

The myth of ubiquitous ICTs. ICTs are neither as ubiquitous nor spreading as fast as many believe. This explains in part the persistence of the digital divide across and within countries.

Productivity lessons for Asia’s tiger cubs

Indeed, a stubbornly high correlation between income level and performance in the NRI exists. There are as many mobile subscriptions as human beings on the planet.

Some 90 percent of population in low-income countries and over 60 percent globally are not online yet. Finally, most mobile phones are of an older generation.

The low-hanging fruit of policymaking. This implies long-term, costly investments in infrastructure and education. But low-hanging fruits do exist. Governments can create an enabling environment by promoting competition through sound regulation and liberalization. Indeed, in terms of liberalization the region is doing better on average than several others. This strategy bodes well for the future. Some countries—including Kenya and Tanzania—are starting to reap the benefits of liberalization in the form of increased private investments and the introduction of new business models and services.

If harnessed properly, ICTs can create economic opportunities and foster social and political inclusion, ultimately contributing to shared prosperity. From an economic point of view, ICTs boost productivity and reduce transaction and information costs.

ICTs foster entrepreneurship and create new business models. Through crowdfunding and equity-crowdfunding platforms, ICTs also provide alternative sources of financing. Furthermore ICTs offer significant social benefits, notably by enabling access to basic services, including financial services and education. They also allow for a more direct interaction between populations and governments. Improved government online presence can significantly increase the efficiency of public administration.

The Internet provides new ways for citizens to participate in policy- and decision-making processes. Open-data initiatives and stronger commitments by governments to making information available online improve transparency, governance, and accountability. Better data for better policies. The lack of good data on some of the most basic indicators of socioeconomic performances, let alone ICT-related concepts, is truly why pakistan is lagging behind in technology in comparison with technology tigers, as it can lead to misguided policies and misallocation of resources.

The NRI suffers from such data paucity. Like any benchmarking exercise, it is only as good as its underlying data. The World Economic Forum is fully aware of the limitations of the data and acknowledges the gaps, particularly when it comes to measuring the impacts of ICTs. We therefore renew our plea for more and better data. A review of the macroeconomic and microeconomic literature on ICT impact on the effects of income growth posits explanations for the mixed relationship and highlights the role of these technologies as income multipliers.

The chapter concludes with a vision of greater ICT-driven inclusive growth in the future. It also highlights specific policies and programs intended to enhance the income effects of ICT on lower-income and marginalized populations. Understanding Digital Content and Services Ecosystems: The authors focus on the role of digital content and services in the evolution and development of the increase in Internet adoption and usage.

To establish a foundation for the research and to understand the way digital content ecosystems evolve, they identify the major content categories that serve as building blocks: They then review the evolution of digital ecosystems in developed nations, considering the United States, Germany, and the Republic of Korea.

The authors find broad similarities in the way Internet content has evolved in these countries, but also key differences in areas such as the degree of government involvement in content generation. The authors devise a method of measuring the maturity of digital content ecosystems, capturing both the depth and variability of content.

They use the resulting index to show the relationship between ecosystem maturity and Internet penetration for each of 75 countries. They find that the evolution of digital content ecosystems is supply-driven, suggesting the need to overbuild content and services in the early stages.

Content ecosystems begin to reach a point of critical mass because of the network effect of sharing platforms. As sharing platforms and online advertising proliferate, e-commerce and other business services assume a larger role, and the ecosystem becomes economically self-sustaining.

The authors conclude that key stakeholders the government, local content providers, telecommunication operators, and global platform providers can play an important role in jumpstarting digital content ecosystems at the early stages of evolution by investing in relevant, local content. This helps to build a user base large enough to reach the critical mass point, which in turn will create the conditions for self-sustainability. ICTs for Inclusive Growth: Those formerly excluded from economic opportunity can now use the Internet for education, research, fundraising, and collaboration to start their own companies—opportunities that would be unimaginable without access to the open Internet.

These companies benefited from the conditions that led to the development of the largest and best-known high-tech cluster—conditions that include access to Stanford University, to venture capital, and to a large pool of skilled employees. Many regions and countries have tried to duplicate the conditions of Silicon Valley to benefit from the resulting startups.