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Why did king george iii want to control the 13 colonies

The Events Leading to Independence Although King George III was later burned in effigy in the streets of the colonies, his relaxed ruling style inspired little ire among the colonists in the 1760s.

9. The Events Leading to Independence

In 1763, few would have predicted that by 1776 a revolution would be unfolding in British America. The ingredients of discontent seemed lacking — at least on the surface.

The colonies were not in a state of economic crisis; on the contrary, they were relatively prosperous. Unlike the Irish, no groups of American citizens were clamoring for freedom from England based on national identity.

King George III was not particularly despotic — surely not to the degree his predecessors of the previous century had been.

Furthermore, the colonies were not unified. Benjamin Franklin discovered this quite clearly when he devised the Albany Plan of Union in 1754.

This plan, under the slogan "Join, or Die," would have brought the colonial rivals together to meet the common threat of the French and Indians. Much to Franklin's chagrin, this plan was soundly defeated. Ben Franklin sketched this cartoon to illustrate the urgency of his 1754 Albany Plan of Union.

  • While perhaps true, Franklin also hoped to convince the French to supply the colonists with aid;
  • The Opposition's favorite historical subject was the downfall of republics, whether those of ancient Greece and Rome, or more recent republican governments in Venice and Denmark;
  • In the wave of patriotism that swept the colonies after the French and Indian War, no one doubted that the America of the future would be British;
  • But those efforts by the king's ministers and Parliament to run the colonies more efficiently and profitably were viewed by more and more Americans as a sinister conspiracy against their liberties.

He unsuccessfully tried to bring the colonies together to defend themselves against Indian and French threats. How, then, in a few short years did everything change? What happened to make the American colonists, most of whom thought of themselves as English subjects, want to break the ties that bound them to their forebears?

What forces led the men and women in the 13 different colonies to set aside their differences and unanimously declare their independence?

  1. Nor is there any indication that Bostonians provoked the soldiers by shouting "fire! Most colonists had hoped that their resistance would either convince the king to dismiss the ministers responsible for the repressive legislation or would jolt Parliament into renouncing its authority over all matters in the colonies except trade regulation.
  2. Their Revolutionary counterparts often browbeat clergymen who preached pro-British sermons, pressured their countrymen to boycott British goods, and coerced merchants to burn British imports. Events in America from 1765-73 that seemed to confirm each of the stages.
  3. For their part, the British found the colonists unwilling to pay their fair share for the administration of the Empire. Much to Franklin's chagrin, this plan was soundly defeated.
  4. Fearing more of the same, he resigned his office the next day, and no one was willing to take his place. Artisans who recognized that non-importation would spur domestic manufacturing began to organize as independent political groups.

Much happened between the years of 1763 and 1776. The colonists felt unfairly taxed, watched over like children, and ignored in their attempts to address grievances. Religious issues rose to the surface, political ideals crystallized, and, as always, economics were the essence of many debates. For their part, the British found the colonists unwilling to pay their fair share for the administration of the Empire. After all, citizens residing in England paid more in taxes than was asked of any American during the entire time of crisis.

The 1770 Boston Massacre was only one in a series of events that led American colonists to revolt against Britain. This was not the first time American colonists found themselves in dispute with Great Britain. But this time the cooler heads did not prevail. Every action by one side brought an equally strong response from the other. The events during these important years created sharp divisions among the English people, among the colonists themselves, and between the English and the Colonists.

  • Artisans who recognized that non-importation would spur domestic manufacturing began to organize as independent political groups;
  • They were, in fact, written by a mild-mannered lawyer named John Dickinson, a man of property with Quaker connections who was dead set against violence;
  • Read Grenville's Defense Townshend Acts, 1767-70;
  • All day, goods brought into town from the countryside had to be "stamped" by the effigy;
  • To tax was to take property;
  • George Washington was the third Virginia representative.

Over time, the geographic distance between England and the colonies became more and more noticeable. It took England time to respond to Colonial provocations and to administer the settled areas of America.

  1. In Williamsburg in April 1775, on orders from the British ministry, Governor Dunmore directed British marines to remove guns and powder stored at the Magazine.
  2. How many colonists remained loyal to the British crown during the Revolution? For proceeds from the duties would be used to pay the salaries of royal governors, customs collectors who were often little more than racketeers who extorted money from merchants and shop keepers , and colonial judges, thus giving them far more independence from the colonial assembles.
  3. They also objected to Parliament's actions in wiping out a whole class of American merchants.
  4. The Quebec Act also recognized the Catholic Church as the official church in Quebec, and designated French civil law as the law system for the province. This plan, under the slogan "Join, or Die," would have brought the colonial rivals together to meet the common threat of the French and Indians.

Further, some now questioned how it could be that a tiny island nation could contain and rule the American continent. Before long, the point of no return was reached. What happened to Benedict Arnold's leg after the Battle of Saratoga?

How many colonists remained loyal to the British crown during the Revolution? Play this "Revolutionary game" to find out.