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The views of holden caulfield about the world and society

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Apr 19, 2011 08: Yet its hero is barely a hero at all. He is disliked and misunderstood, a classic "screw-up", who does poorly in school, loses his team's equipment, and takes an impulsive trip to New York to see his sister and his old teacher. How can we Americans, who like our heroes bold, active, and "likeable" be receptive to Holden Caulfield? Here is a protagonist beloved not for what he does or fails to do but for what he thinks. Holden Caulfield is no genius; he is simply in too much pain to be anything but honest.

We like him because we trust him. We know he will not lie. He may be confused about life, but not how he feels about it. Holden is not afraid to see things for what they are. He expresses thoughts we have but rarely allow ourselves to admit--that we despise authority, that most people are hypocrites, and that life pretty much disappoints us.

Holden Caulfield's View Of The World

Holden is the yin to our yang. Many of us do the right thing at the right time, but we're never sure why it's right or how we feel about it. Holden Caulfield almost always does the wrong thing, but he is saved by one great and powerful insight--that life is painful and confusing.

He is open to this fact, he does not deny it or euphemise it. However, knowing something solves nothing.

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Holden's knowledge can only destroy him if he does not learn how to use it. The objective of his journey to New York is to learn how to cope with what he knows. He is the American Hamlet, stumbling and bumbling his way from excruciating knowledge to coherent action. Unlike Tommy Wilhelm in Seize the Day, Holden has most of his life ahead of him, with time to steer himself on a positive course. The reader ends the book believing that Holden's sensitivity will mature into something strong and worthwhile.

  1. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel which was "full of perverts and morons.
  2. Holden is not afraid to see things for what they are.
  3. By that I mean firstly that they were not relevant, and secondly that they were poorly written. Holden spends the following evening in this hotel which was "full of perverts and morons.
  4. Holden is not afraid to see things for what they are.
  5. This is the only time during the novel where Holden thinks twice about considering someone as a pervert. These convictions which Holden holds waver very momentarily during only one particular scene in the book.