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The symbolic significance of the setting in john knowles s separate peace

Here you will find our analysis of components or themes found in the book, and our view and interpretations of events in the book. Gene is a lonely, introverted intellectual.

In A Separate Peace, what is the point of the rivers being described as they are?

Phineas is a handsome, taunting, daredevil athlete. What happens between the two friends one summer, like the war itself, banishes the innocence of these boys and their world. Thursday, December 16, 2010 Leizel's Analysis of the Setting In A Separate Peace, the setting is extremely important and the following quotes shows this: It is the beauty of small areas of order—a large yard, a group of trees, three similar dormitories, circle of old houses—living together in contentious harmony.

It is set at the Devon School which is a prestigious prep school for adolescent boys. It is a secluded and sheltered area where they are aware of the events occurring outside of the school, yet it has no direct effect on them World War II.

A Separate Peace Setting & Symbolism

It is here where the stage is set for the two main characters, Gene and Phineas, to develop as people and discover their place in their society. It is clear that based on the description of their school campus that the area is of middle to upper class.

  1. These two rivers represent boyhood the Devon and adulthood the Naguamsett. It is here where the stage is set for the two main characters, Gene and Phineas, to develop as people and discover their place in their society.
  2. It is here where the stage is set for the two main characters, Gene and Phineas, to develop as people and discover their place in their society.
  3. Later, it is the place in which the boys jump from a tall branch into the water and where Phineas has his accident. It is clear that based on the description of their school campus that the area is of middle to upper class.

In the summer of 1942, World War II was raging and though the people at this school do not have to live with the same problems, both their struggles are to find and achieve peace. In this way, the World War II time period as the setting is important so that as the plot builds up their conflicts are drawing similar parallels.

This is an important aspect of the setting because of its symbolic meanings.

For example, this is the meeting point of Gene and Phineas and they are always jumping out of it. It symbolizes how as the whole world is in turmoil, they are free and peaceful. As the story develops, the setting of the tree and its role progresses too.

Related Questions

Winters occupation seems to have conquered, overrun and destroyed everything, so that now there is no longer any resistance movement in nature; all the juices are dead, every spring of vitality snapped, and now winter itself, an old, corrupt, tired conqueror, loosens its grip on the desolation, recedes a little, grows careless in its watch; sick of victory and enfeebled by the absence of challenge, it begins to withdraw itself from the ruined countryside.

The season in which events occur is important to the story in that in the glowing months of summer the boys have their fun, but in the desolation of winter, their problems heighten. Since the seasons are used in relation to the story, it acts as part of the symbolism and imagery. The setting is extremely important in this story. The entire story revolves around the coming of age of Gene and Phineas.

  • Here, too, Gene remains a part of Finny, unable to stand apart on his own;
  • This is an important aspect of the setting because of its symbolic meanings;
  • The Devon is described as a place of fun, and it is the river into which Phineas leaps from his canoe;
  • Here, too, Gene remains a part of Finny, unable to stand apart on his own;
  • It is the beauty of small areas of order—a large yard, a group of trees, three similar dormitories, circle of old houses—living together in contentious harmony;
  • It is a secluded and sheltered area where they are aware of the events occurring outside of the school, yet it has no direct effect on them World War II.