Term papers writing service


The life of chris mccandless in into the wild by jon krakauer

Expert Answers

There he headed down the snow-covered trail to begin an odyssey with only 10 pounds 4500 g of rice, a. He declined an acquaintance's offer to buy him sturdier clothing and better supplies. McCandless perished sometime around the week of August 18, 1992, after surviving more than 100 days. McCandless shed his legal name early in his journey, adopting the moniker "Alexander Supertramp", after W.

He spent time in Carthage, South Dakotalaboring for months in a grain elevator owned by Wayne Westerberg before hitchhiking to Alaska.

Krakauer interprets McCandless' intensely ascetic personality as possibly influenced by the writings of Henry David Thoreau and McCandless' favorite writer, Jack London. He explores the similarities between McCandless' experiences and motivations, and his own as a young man, recounting in detail Krakauer's own attempt to climb Devils Thumb in Alaska.

  • After three months, Chris McCandless had evidently decided to return to society;
  • If anything, the photographs deepened the mystery;
  • Unlock All Answers Now;
  • Chris was born to relatively well-off parents, but rejected their lifestyle as being corrupted by materialism;
  • McCandless shed his legal name early in his journey, adopting the moniker "Alexander Supertramp", after W;
  • However, Krakauer later suggested that McCandless had not confused the two plants and had in fact actually eaten Hedysarum alpinum.

Krakauer also relates the stories of some other young men who vanished into the wilderness, such as Everett Ruessan artist and wanderer who went missing in the Utah desert during 1934, at age 20. In addition, he describes at some length the grief and puzzlement of McCandless' parents, sister Carine, and friends. Cause of death[ edit ] McCandless survived for approximately 113 days in the Alaskan wilderness, foraging for edible roots and berries, shooting an assortment of game —including a moose —and keeping a journal.

Although he planned to hike to the coast, the boggy terrain of summer proved too difficult, and he decided instead to camp in a derelict bus. In July, he tried to leave, only to find the route blocked by a snow-melt swollen river. Fault Of Pot[ato] Seed" [5] [6] Based on this entry, Krakauer hypothesized that McCandless had been eating what he thought was the roots of an edible plant, Hedysarum alpinumcommonly known as wild Eskimo potatowhich are sweet and nourishing in the spring but later become too tough to eat.

From Into the Wild, who was Chris McCandless?

When this happened, McCandless may have attempted to eat the seeds instead. Krakauer first speculated that the seeds were actually from Hedysarum mackenziior wild sweet pea, instead of the Eskimo Potato, which contained a poisonous alkaloidpossibly swainsonine the toxic chemical in locoweed or something similar.

In addition to neurological symptoms, such as weakness and loss of coordination, the poison causes starvation by blocking nutrient metabolism in the body. However, Krakauer later suggested that McCandless had not confused the two plants and had in fact actually eaten Hedysarum alpinum.

Chris McCandless Went Into The Wild In 1992 And Never Came Out

Krakauer had the plant tested for any toxins and, through tests on Hendysarum alpinum, it was discovered that it contained an unidentifiable form of toxin. However, when the Eskimo potatoes from the area around the bus were later tested in a laboratory of the University of Alaska Fairbanks by Dr. Thomas Clausen, toxins were not found. Krakauer later modified his hypothesis, suggesting that mold of the variety Rhizoctonia leguminicola may have caused McCandless's death.

Rhizoctonia leguminicola is known to cause digestion problems in livestock, and may have aided McCandless's impending starvation.

  • However, if he had eaten the seeds as a last resort, his digestive system may have been too weak to combat the poison;
  • I wish everyone could do this;
  • But the most important is that Happiness only exists when shared.

Krakauer hypothesised that the bag in which Chris kept the potato seeds was damp and the seeds thus became moldy. If McCandless had eaten seeds that contained this mold, he could have become sick, and Krakauer suggests that he thus became unable to get out of bed and so starved.

His basis for the mold hypothesis is a photograph that shows seeds in a bag. Following chemical analysis of the seeds, Krakauer now believes that the seeds themselves are poisonous.

  • However, the last month of entries seemed to paint an entirely different picture;
  • Chris was born to relatively well-off parents, but rejected their lifestyle as being corrupted by materialism;
  • However, when the Eskimo potatoes from the area around the bus were later tested in a laboratory of the University of Alaska Fairbanks by Dr;
  • Although he planned to hike to the coast, the boggy terrain of summer proved too difficult, and he decided instead to camp in a derelict bus.

In his study of McCandless' death, Lamothe concludes that McCandless ran out of supplies and game, and starved to death, instead of being poisoned by eating the seeds of the wild potato. The material includes hundreds of McCandless' previously unseen pictures and journal entries.