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The life of bobby knight in the book season on the brink by john feinstein

Covers the Indiana Hoosiers in a fairly unremarkable season in classic Feinstein fashion. I think my understanding of Bob Knight didn't change so much as it broadened. He would still be probably the last famous basketball coach I would choose to play for.

A Season on the Brink

He has reprehensible views on gender, and no one should be surprised that a faux-macho guy like Knight gravitated to a fraud like Trump. However, there are things about Coach Knight that make him diffe A good listen for college basketball nuts. However, there are things about Coach Knight that make him different, well, better than a Trump. He's a man of rules.

A Season on the Brink: A Year with Bob Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers

Some of them are bad rules, like refusing to work with women on his staff. He also believes firmly in following the NCAA's rules, which many coaches skirt or violate to their advantage. He makes his players go to class, follows through on punishments if they don't, and gets a huge portion of them to graduate I'm looking at you John Calipari.

He will do anything for his friends and former players, even ones with whom he didn't have a great relationship. Several times in the book, he reached out with great warmness and generosity to kids with disabilities. So there's more to Bob Knight than a screaming, sexist chair-thrower. However, that's also an integral part of who he is.

In this book, he repeatedly crosses the line with his language and treatment of his players.

A Year with Bob Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers

To some extent he's strategic with the tirades and mind games, but it's clear that he often just loses control. The players and staff live in a kind of terror and misery because of his temper. Basketball should be a little bit fun, even at the highest levels, but playing for Knight doesn't seem to be that way. There really seems to be serious emotional instability here, as well as a fixation on the negative.

Given his behavior after this book at Indiana and Texas Tech, it's clear that he never really got control of his emotions and learned to treat people as if they have feelings too. I'm not trying to say that there's not a place for toughness in coaching, but that toughness should be controlled, not meted out in random bursts and mind games that simply aren't fair to the players.

So I understand Bob Knight a lot better, but I still don't like him. I'd say Feinstein is an excellent guide to this team and this season.

A season on the brink : a year with Bob Knight and the Indiana Hoosiers

I'd say this book deserves the reputation it has as a great sports book. Actually, the fact that Knight didn't like the book, despite how fair Feinstein was to him, should be consider another notch against his character.

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Instead, I consumed the entire book in one sitting, as it was an absolutely enjoyable read and kept me interested throughout. The book itself is basically a documentary of the 1985-86 Indiana Hoosiers, who had disappointed mightily in the year beforehand, and thus, needed a makeup season, not just for the school, who expects their basketball team to contend for national and conf I came in with low expectations of this book, perhaps something to take a peek at a few pages and kinda leave it there.

The book itself is basically a documentary of the 1985-86 Indiana Hoosiers, who had disappointed mightily in the year beforehand, and thus, needed a makeup season, not just for the school, who expects their basketball team to contend for national and conference titles every year, but for Bobby Knight, the coach of the squad, who himself is notable for his short-fused temper.

This temper becomes perhaps the most important plotline throughout the book, as he has to figure out how to deal with his angry outbursts, while coaching an inexperienced team that would almost certainly wilt under the pressure if he were to constantly destroy them mentally. To see Knight sometimes being portrayed as someone who is actively controlling his temper would strike most familiar with the sport as strange, considering his tenure at Indiana was ended in 2000 thanks to a physical assault of a player.

It is a thoroughly good thing, that the Bobby Knight-types in coaching are dying out -- the last thing that sports needs are the petty tyrants who justify abuse as motivation.

However, this book is written in such a way that does make him seem like a person trying his best to cope with the fact that his competitive nature overtakes the logical and perhaps even warm side of him a lot of times. Feinstein does a good job at presenting him as a fully fleshed out human; in short, it's probably the most sympathetic portrayal of him as a whole. Still, the writing and the portrayal of coaches and players makes it a worthy read.