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The history and importance of sabbath in the judaism religion

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Therefore, G-d commanded you to keep the Sabbath day. In this version of the Commandment, an entirely different reason is given for the Sabbath. Here we find that the Sabbath is meant to recall the Exodus rather than Creation. What is the connection between the two? What does the Sabbath have to do with the Exodus? If we say that the Sabbath is merely a "day of rest" and a time to relax after a week's work, how can we even begin to understand these things?

The truth is that we can't, and if we really want to gain a real understanding of the Shabbos, we must re-examine the most basic ideas of Judaism. A Question of Belief Judaism begins and ends with G-d. It is essentially a way of life that brings man to G-d. One who denies G-d, rejects the very basis of Judaism, and is totally cut off from it.

All this may seem very fundamental and obvious, but it is one thing to say that you believe, and it is another to understand exactly what you believe. Suppose a person were to say, "I believe in G-d. He certainly does not believe in G-d, much less so in a Jewish sense. What he believes in is idolatry, not G-d. We know that G-d is not a statue.

  1. One of the meals must include bread. All the waves of persecution and prejudice break before this rock of faith.
  2. The Sabbath is commanded by God Every week religious Jews observe the Sabbath, the Jewish holy day, and keep its laws and customs.
  3. Thus Sabbath, which is Saturday, begins at sundown Friday night. It's all about freedom.
  4. The Greeks thought Jews were lazy because we insisted on having a "holiday" every seventh day. As creator of all things, G-d must be both greater than all creation and distinct from it.

But what is He? This is a very difficult and complex question to discuss, but we do have certain concepts about G-d which form a fundamental part of all of Jewish tradition and teaching.

G-d is as real as anything else in the world. He is One and unique. He is absolutely incorporeal, having neither body, shape nor form. Anyone who says that he believes in G-d but denies these truths, is fooling himself.

  • It is an integral part of Jewish custom and ceremony;
  • This is clear from the fact that more aliyot opportunities for congregants to be called up to the Torah are given on Shabbat than on any other day.

He may say that he believes in G-d, but what he really has done is to set up an idol and called it G-d. You are standing in a room with Mr. You make a statement: Smith is indeed absent," you point to Mr.

Jones and say, "This is Mr. Smith does not make it so; neither does saying that Mr.

Sabbath: Prohibitions, Observances

Jones is G-d make it so. If you say that you believe in G-d, but do not believe that He is as real as you or I, or that He is One, then you really do not believe in G-d, at least, not the Jewish concept of G-d. You are really speaking of something else.

But how do we, as Jews, define G-d? We find the answer in the very first verse of the Torah. G-d is the Creator of all things. He is the One who brought all things into existence. This has some very important implications.

  • In the Torah, the purpose of Sabbath observance is to remind the Hebrew people of two very important events in history;
  • In Jewish homes the woman of the house lights white Sabbath candles before sunset on Friday evening and pronounces a benediction;
  • Jews often call the day Shabbat, which is Hebrew for Sabbath, and which comes from the Hebrew word for rest.

As creator of all things, G-d must be both greater than all creation and distinct from it. Therefore, we, as Jews, reject the philosophy of pantheism. As creator, G-d's existence cannot depend on any of his creatures. Our definition therefore rejects any concept of G-d as an abstract ethical force or social convention. If a person says that he believes in G-d, but does not believe that He is Creator, then he does not really believe in the Jewish concept of G-d.

But there is another point in our belief in G-d. Some people think that G-d created the world and then forgot about it. They may claim to believe in G-d, and even admit to some abstract Creator, but they insist, at the same time, that his existence has no bearing on their lives. To them, G-d is a remote philosophical abstraction. We see G-d as much more than this.

It was here that the entire Jewish people experienced G-d. To them, G-d was no mere abstraction. They saw His deeds to such an extent that they were actually able to point and say, "This is my G-d.

He is violating the first of the Ten Commandments. In the light of these concepts, we can now understand the significance of the Sabbath. It must also involve action in the form of our steadfast adherence to G-d's will.

Shabbat: What is Shabbat?

The Hebrew word for faith is Emunah. It comes from the same root as Uman a craftsman. Faith cannot be separated from Action. But, by what act in particular do we demonstrate our belief in G-d as Creator? The answer now becomes obvious. The one ritual that does this is the observance of the Sabbath. It is the confirniation of our belief in G-d as the Creator of all things.

We now understand what the Talmud means when it says that one who does not keep the Sabbath is like an idol worshipper. Violation of the Sabbath is an implicit denial of faith in G-d, the Creator. We can also understand why the Sabbath violator is considered outside the Jewish community. Judaism exists as a community striving toward G-d. One who denies G-d as we know Him, cuts himself off from his community. For the Jew, belief in G-d is more than a mere creed or catechism.

It is the basis of all meaning in life, for if the world does not have a creator, then what possible meaning can there be in existence! Man becomes nothing more than a complex physiochemical process, no more important than an ant or a grain of sand. Morality becomes a matter of convenience, or "might makes right". It is the belief in G-d that gives life purpose and meaning. It is also what gives us a standard of right and wrong.

If we know that G-d created the world, and did so for a purpose, then we also realize that everything that furthers this purpose is "good," and everything that runs counter to this purpose is "evil. One who does not actively believe in G-d as creator of the the history and importance of sabbath in the judaism religion, divorces himself from these two most basic values. He therefore, casts himself outside of Judaism. This also explains the reason Sabbath violation incurs the death penalty.

For life itself involves purpose. A purposeless life is, in reality, no life at all. In a sense, therefore, one who does not keep the Sabbath is not really considered alive in the first place. The existence of the death penalty in such a case is not a mere vindication, but the confirmation of an already existent situation. In a positive sense, the Sabbath is the focus of Jewish belief. Once each week, the Jew spends a day reinforcing his belief in G-d. As long as Jews keep the Sabbath, G-d remains an integral force in their lives.

Their faith is like a rock, and nothing can shake it. All the waves of persecution and prejudice break before this rock of faith. With this belief, they not only survive, they flourish. For one day each week, the Jew can see himself in G-d's eye, and before G-d, every man is a king. This is as true today as always. Many of our leaders bewail the decline of Judaism.

But this decline is only to be found where the Sabbath is neglected. Among the community of Sabbath observers, Judaism is the same living and vital force that it always was.

It should also be obvious that eventually He would reveal this purpose to man. This immediately brings us to the Exodus. It is the Exodus that make Judaism unique. G-d revealed Himself to an entire people, and literally changed the course of nature for a forty year period. This was an event unique in the history of mankind.

You have had sure proof that the L-rd is G-d, there is no other. The others all began with a single individual, who claimed to have spoken to G-d or arrived at Truth.

  • The Sabbath is commanded by God Every week religious Jews observe the Sabbath, the Jewish holy day, and keep its laws and customs;
  • The word "Shabbat" comes from the root Shin-Beit-Tav, meaning to cease, to end, or to rest;
  • Orthodox Jews tend to focus more on the Saturday morning service, and their Friday service is relatively short around 45 minutes;
  • It must also involve action in the form of our steadfast adherence to G-d's will;
  • They saw His deeds to such an extent that they were actually able to point and say, "This is my G-d.

This individual gradually spread his teachings, forming the basis of a new religion. Virtually every great world religion follows this pattern. Judaism is unique in that G-d spoke to an entire people, three million people at the same time, who saw with their own eyes and heard with their own ears. That one historic, traumatic experience is the solid bedrock of Jewish faith.