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The different reactions of children as described in william goldings the lord of the flies

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Early in Golding's novel, the notion of a "beast" lurking in the woods is introduced to the boys by a particularly young child, about six years old. This child cautiously approaches Ralph during a ritualistic gathering or assembly to inquire about a strange object he observed.

The "beast" has quickly assumed almost mythological proportions in the minds of the young boys stranded on the island in William Golding's Lord of the Flies. As the boy is prompted to speak, the others discuss this peculiar sighting: The "beast," however, is not some figurative boogeyman, in that it exists in the children's minds only as a legend with which to have fun.

Rather, the "beast" becomes a dividing point separating the boys into factions.

  • Note, in the following passage, how the "beast" serves to fracture any kind of consensus regarding a structured civilization governed by rules;
  • It is not at the end of Chapter Seven that Golding describes the boys' reaction to the sighting of the "beast," however.

The tension and fear associated with the "beast" does not serve to unify the boys against a common threat; it serves, instead, to create fissures among them that will prove deadly. Note, in the following passage, how the "beast" serves to fracture any kind of consensus regarding a structured civilization governed by rules: Ralph summoned his wits.

If there's a beast, we'll hunt it down! We'll close in and beat and beat and beat—!

It is in Chapter Seven where the boys finally encounter the creature that has terrified and fascinated them. As Jack, Ralph and Roger approach the strange bulge, Golding's unseen narrator describes the scene: Before them, something like a great ape was sitting asleep with its head between its knees.

Then the wind roared in the forest, there was confusion in the darkness and the creature lifted its head, holding toward them the ruin of a face. It is not at the end of Chapter Seven that Golding describes the boys' reaction to the sighting of the "beast," however.

  • This child cautiously approaches Ralph during a ritualistic gathering or assembly to inquire about a strange object he observed;
  • Ralph, Piggy , and the soon to be killed Simon exclude themselves from the "hunters'" descent into chaos, with Jack leading his followers with the chant, "Kill the beast!
  • The "beast" has quickly assumed almost mythological proportions in the minds of the young boys stranded on the island in William Golding's Lord of the Flies;
  • All that happens at the end of Chapter Seven, following the brief description cited above, is the boys' rapid departure from the site of the creature;
  • Jack capitalizes on the notion of an external threat to rally the boys around him; his ability to provide them meat solidifies his ascendency;
  • Ralph found himself taking giant strides among the ashes, heard other creatures crying out and leaping and dared the impossible on the dark slope; presently the mountain was deserted, save for the three abandoned sticks and the thing that bowed.

All that happens at the end of Chapter Seven, following the brief description cited above, is the boys' rapid departure from the site of the creature: Ralph found himself taking giant strides among the ashes, heard other creatures crying out and leaping and dared the impossible on the dark slope; presently the mountain was deserted, save for the three abandoned sticks and the thing that bowed.

The identity of the "beast," or "creature," had been, the reader realizes, provided in Chapter Six with the description of a parachute dropping aimlessly onto the island, the aircraft from which it originated apparently destroyed: The myth of a "beast," though, remains too important for Jack to dispense with the notion of an outside threat to the boys.

Castle Rock Lord Of The Flies

After killing and cooking the boar, Jack cements his dominance over many of the boys. Ralph, Piggyand the soon to be killed Simon exclude themselves from the "hunters'" descent into chaos, with Jack leading his followers with the chant, "Kill the beast!

The boys continue to fear the beast, because that serves Jack's purpose.

  1. The "beast," however, is not some figurative boogeyman, in that it exists in the children's minds only as a legend with which to have fun. The boys continue to fear the beast, because that serves Jack's purpose.
  2. If there's a beast, we'll hunt it down!
  3. The tension and fear associated with the "beast" does not serve to unify the boys against a common threat; it serves, instead, to create fissures among them that will prove deadly. Then the wind roared in the forest, there was confusion in the darkness and the creature lifted its head, holding toward them the ruin of a face.

Jack capitalizes on the notion of an external threat to rally the boys around him; his ability to provide them meat solidifies his ascendency.