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The composition and writing stile of web du bois in the souls of black folks

It will be published by A. The full text of the review is presented below in its entirety with notes, indicated by bracketed asterisks, added by RWW: This book is an important contribution to higher literature by a coloured writer. The author is a professor at Atlanta University. His work found its way into high-class magazines, as The Atlantic Monthly, World's Work, and other leading periodicals. His book is marked by fine literary grace.

It is in some respects a cry de profundis. He echoes the bitter cry of his coloured kinsmen: The shadows of the prison-house closed round about us all, walls relentlessly narrow and unscalable to sons of night who must beat unavailing palms against the stone. Education, intellectual, but still more industrial, is the only solution of this problem. A fine poetical vein runs through these papers.

McClurg edition, Du Bois wrote: With other black boys the strife was not so fiercely sunny: The shades of the prison-house closed round about us all: In the original text of the review, note that a the subtitle of Souls was not included within the double quotation marks encompassing the main title; and b the periodical titles in the review were not italicized.

First page in the full text of the periodical at the Google Books site http: The periodical was edited by Albert Shaw.

  1. Much might be said by way of moralizing upon the frame of mind which leads to a casual reference to Sam Hose as having been "crucified,"--so also might we upon such a sketch as that entitled "Of the Coming of John,"--but the moralizing would be as barren of any possible good as was the incorporation of this story in the book.
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  3. The review is provided below in its entirety.
  4. How does it re-define them? There are nearly ten millions of coloured men ln the southern States of America, and they are increasing at a ratio infinitely greater than the increase of the whites.
  5. How does it re-define them? The Souls of Black Folk,1 by Mr.

The full text of the review is presented below in its entirety along with the portrait sketch found in the original publication: As related to the renewed discussion of the negro problem in this country, the little volume of essays and sketches entitled "The Souls of Black Folks," by Prof.

Burghardt Du Bois Chicago: Washington, the highest rank among American negro educationists. In his present book, Professor Du Bois emphasizes the need of spiritual and intellectual culture for the negro rather than the more practical and utilitarian ends kept so steadily in view by Mr.

Washington in his work at Tuskegee. Professor Du Bois is a man of the highest culture, and he cannot overcome the sensitiveness natural to a man of fine feelings placed in the position that he occupies. There is a natural tendency on his part to interpret the aspirations of his people through his own individual strivings and emotions. The result is truly pathetic; but as a practical contribution to the solution of the educational problem for the black race his essays cannot be regarded as of equal value with the widely published lectures and addresses of Mr.

Nevertheless, they well repay reading, representing, as they do, a phase of thought that has, perhaps, been too long neglected by some of those who would deal with the problem as a whole. Of the literary quality of the essays too much cannot be said. No book of similar character has been printed in recent years that equals this little volume in power or grace of expression. Also, due to formatting differences between the original periodical and this html version, the sketch is not in its precise position.

I was unable to find the artist's name. The portrait was obtained via screen capture software and, with the exception of slightly enlarging the image for easier viewing, is presented here "as-it-was. The comment is provided below in its entirety and verbatim including the ellipsis and the various errors.

The Souls of Black Folk,1 by Mr. Burghardt du [sic] Bois, is an eloquent appeal to the American people to foster and develop "the traits and talents of the negro, in order that some day, on American soil, two world-races may give each to each those characteristics both so sadly lack. There is no true American music but the wild sweet melodies of the negro slave; the American fairy tales and folk-lore are Indian and African; and, all in all, we black men seem the sole oasis of simple faith and reverence in a dusky desert of dollars and smartness.

Burghardt, [sic] the indirect results of Mr. Washington's teachings have been: Now, the emancipation of these nine millions of men cannot be complete until the nation has granted them the right to vote, civic equality, and the education of youth according to ability. This work offers a rational solution to the colour problem that has so long perplexed the United States. Burghardt du [sic] Bois. The review is provided below in its entirety.

The word "Negro" is not capitalized in the original text. The Souls of Black Folk.

Reflective Writing Exercises

In point of literary excellence this collection of articles by Dr. DuBois is entitled to a place in the first rank of the varied and ever-increasing literature of the "race problem. Throughout the book is tinctured with bitterness, a bitterness unfortunate even though pardonable and easily understood by those who are acquainted with something of the life of its author. It is at once a protest and a plea; a protest against the identification of the individual with the mass,--a plea for public and personal consideration unaffected by questions of color or race.

This does not mean to my comprehension of the book an appeal for "social equality" between white and black, as the world understands that term, a braking down of social barriers between the races as races, but rather a plea for individual treatment based upon individual character and deserts.

This runs through the book and dominates its entire tone, and after one has finished it and put it down, let him turn back to its very beginning if he would reason for himself upon the question of the attitude of the white race toward those whom the author calls black.

He may learn there something of the force of instinct and heredity which exhibits itself in childhood, and so often in maturer years stifles even the voice of sympathy and reason. These pages tell that it was not as a man seeking a school in the South that the author first learned to feel that he "was different from the others;" it was in far off New England, and even as a child, that he first awakened to the presence of "the shadow of the veil. Washington may be fair enough in its essentials, possibly, but when we read his criticism of it we are prone to ask, "What, then, would Dr.

DuBois is the composition and writing stile of web du bois in the souls of black folks thoughtful a man to countenance any such suggestion,--yet until one is prepared to go as far as may be necessary along the line of insistence it is difficult to understand the wisdom of taking issue with Principal Washington's course.

Much might be said by way of moralizing upon the frame of mind which leads to a casual reference to Sam Hose as having been "crucified,"--so also might we upon such a sketch as that entitled "Of the Coming of John,"--but the moralizing would be as barren of any possible good as was the incorporation of this story in the book.

Despite the cry of the "negrophobist" already raised in some quarters to anticipate the suggestion, the fact remains that to one reared among the negroes of the South--to one who is living a life of daily contact and association with the masses of these people--to one who has enjoyed their confidences and listened to their recitals of grievances and wrongs personal and peculiar to themselves,--to this man it is not "the souls of black folk" thus laid bare.

Herein may the really thoughtful of those who consider America's "race problem" find food for sober reflection,--for here may they learn, perhaps for the first time, that possibly already this problem is become "the problem of the color line. To such as these this book suggests a moral upon its every page; by the many to whom "the problem" they so knowingly discuss presents but a single hue, it will be used to bolster up time worn theories of "the negro question.

For a brief discussion of A. Stone and his scientific racism see James G. Willcox, is available at the Internet Archive: The full text of the review is presented below in its entirety and verbatim: Burghardt Du Bois Messrs.

We bear a good deal of the colour question in our politics, and many legislative nostrums are being tried in regard to it. But we have no serious colour question here as the United States of America have in the negro problem.

It is a problem self-created by the slavery system of the past, but it is nevertheless, very real, and calls urgently for solution. In portions of the country the solutions tried are the inexpressibly brutal ones of the faggot and the petroleum tin—eforts to deal with the ebullitions of an animalism which once was covertly encouraged by means too savagae [sic] for realisation outside the communities in which they have, alas, come to be treated as at least "necessary" evils.

And in the political world the attempt at solution is open and flagrant and dishonest tampering with the Constitution and interference with justice. Yet much as we may condemn the terrible methods used by sections of the whites in Amerlca towards their coloured fellow countrymen, we are bound to admit that the problem is both patent and puzzling.

The maintenance of the white race and adherence to principles of constitutional equality and justice do not seem compatible. There is hope—for the negro—in the work of such men as Booker Washington with his Tuskegee Institute and the co-operative farming associations, but just as the white birth-rate falls and the black race maintains its fecundity does the problem become the more complicated from the white standpoint.

In the series of essays comprising this book Mr. The composition and writing stile of web du bois in the souls of black folks are nearly ten millions of coloured men ln the southern States of America, and they are increasing at a ratio infinitely greater than the increase of the whites.

W.E.B. DuBois Writing Styles in The Souls of Black Folk

Nearly two-thirds of them cannot read and write. Their rulers are to a large extent to be blamed for that particular state of things, but some sections of the white community would have it maintained. These claim that the most dangerous element of the coloured population—to them—is precisely the element which has had some educational advantages. It is a book to be read—and pondered over—both for its intrinsic literary merits and the message it conveys. Other misspellings are identified. Dymocks still exists as a bookseller in Australia.

For its history read " The Dymocks Story " on the web. The review is accessible online at the Google News Archives. Originally published in The Atlantic Monthly, Vol.