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Sociology in relation with schindler s list

Monday, 16 April 2012 Schindler's List "I would like so much to reach out to you and touch you in your loneliness. What would it be like, I wonder?

What would be wrong with that? I realize that you are not a person in the strictest sense of the word, but, um, maybe you're right about that too. Maybe what's wrong, it's not us, it's this.

I mean, when they compare you to vermin, to rodents and to lice. I just, uh, you make a good point. You make a very good point. Is this the face of a rat? Are these the eyes of a rat? As Helen, his maid, stands helplessly and shaking with fear, he tells her what he feels about what it could be like being with her.

His attraction for her has kept her alive thus long, but she is forbidden to wear the Star of David, as he wouldn't want anyone catching his admiration towards her. It appears that he is trying to reach out to her but in reality, he is simply satisfying his own needs. It was not help he was offering but rather, convincing himself that it was allowed to be attracted to a Jew. This monologue represents Goeth's inner conflict. He then turns the tables around and accuses her of coming on to him.

He had almost given in to his impulse but suddenly loathes himself for his behavior and behaves aggressively towards her. I cannot help but wonder. If Jews were really considered vermin and so forth, how then, can one in the position of hate be attracted to such?

It became evident to me that it was not a matter of disgust that could be rationalized logically. Because no human would ever be sexually attracted to a literal rat. In the vast extermination of Jews, methods that were used the gas chambers, the camps, the ghettos could really be applied to the extermination of literal rats.

Goeth is an example of blind-hate, hate that is merely taught and a greed for power that further propels such illogical hatred. In my opinion, this inner conflict with his feelings for his maid is a product of confusion. Being brought up in an environment where you are constantly taught to despise, and further rewarded for it, and in the midst of all the loathe-expressive frenzy, he finds the enemy desirable.

He acknowledges her positive attributes, but cannot accept such an attraction because it defies what he had been taught to believe. In the movie, Inglorious Basterds, Col.

  1. According to Gustavo Perednik in his book titled "Judeophobia-History and analysis of Antisemitism, Jew-Hate and anti- Zionism", Jews were very much hated in economic situations. But if one were to determine what attributes the Jews share with a beast, it would be that of a rat.
  2. One explanation that could provide for Judeophobia is that it was mostly seen as hatred that is equivalent to grudges toward the wealthy attributed to the lower classes of society.
  3. I just, uh, you make a good point.

Hans Landa provides his own distinctions between Germans and Jews: But if one were to determine what attributes the Jews share with a beast, it would be that of a rat.

If a rat were to walk in here right now as I;m talking, would you treat it to a saucer of your delicious milk? You don't really know why you don't like them. All you know is you find them repulsive. Many despised Jews, but cannot even begin to provide concrete reasoning for such a strong emotion they possessed. It seemed to me that hate cultivated other negative and brash emotions and feelings such as disgust and repulsion. Because rats are, to be fair, dirty creatures that carry diseases.

Schindlers List Essay

They are unwanted because of their filth and their survival heavily depends on human wastes. Is that how Jews were once viewed? Filthy beasts who reaped the bounties of other human beings? Most importantly, sociology in relation with schindler s list such hate ever see the light of logicality? Perhaps the exploration of some past theories or school of though might provide some insight on the issue.

Who has made us Jews different from all other people? Who has allowed us to suffer so terribly up till now? Judeophobia was a term coined by Pinsker, and has been the deepest and longest hatred in human history.

In Pinsker's eyes, Jews were "ghost people", as the world saw them in the ugliest image of walking corpses itself. Unity, structure, land, and flag were lacking in Jews thus they were regarded as a people who had ceased to exist, but lived with some sort of resemblance to what others called a life.

The idea of "ghost people", according to Pinsker, is that the fear of ghosts are innate, and since that is so, we are asked to imagine the fear we ought to have for a dead nation that lives on. So where does this leave Jews? The fear is platonic, and abstract, and has led many sociology in relation with schindler s list to believe that Jews were responsible for real crimes. This terror for the Jewish community had marched its way into many generations.

In his book, Judeophobia, by Gustavo Perednik, this Jewish ghost-fear has had its roots set deep in human race, what he calls heredity psychosis. The powerlessness theory In the late 1940s, Judeophobia became past of society even when nothing was done to provoke it. Zionist thinkers formulated explanations, who saw Judeophobia as something that could be acquired by instinct toward the powerless Jews. The Jews during the Holocaust were truly powerless despite the Judeophobic myth; they were not able to save themselves from the Holocaust nor they were able to persuade Western government to destroy the concentration camps and their railroads.

According to this view, if the Jews really had power as a group, and not just power from being an individual, that is, the power that came from being intermediaries of those who were in real position of power, they would have been able to interfere with the destruction of their people during World War 2. The reason these theories are called "Zionictic approaches" is because it aims to cure or to the very least, reduce the effects of Judeophobia. It aims to give power to Jews so they may defend themselves.

These theories specify that certain roles in which Jews held in their society exposed them to special hatred. Part of the job scope included collecting taxes on the behalf of landlords from poor peasants. One explanation that could provide for Judeophobia is that it was mostly seen as hatred that is equivalent to grudges toward the wealthy attributed to the lower classes of society.

Some economic explanations, like Pirenne's theory of the advent of modernity go the extent of extending Jews to the entire economic system, where they were considered the cause of capitalism. According to Gustavo Perednik in his book titled "Judeophobia-History and analysis of Antisemitism, Jew-Hate and anti- Zionism", Jews were very much hated in economic situations.

Also, Jews were public faces of ruling elites. They held professions such as lawyers, doctors, teachers, psychologists and social workers, and thus appeared to posses power when in fact they really possessed such a power.