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Many canadians find issues in the government unacceptable

In general, Canadians are a mostly friendly, unpretentious people who value honesty, sensitivity, empathy and humility in their relationships with friends and strangers, as well as respect for the privacy and individualism of others.

  1. Religion Canadians have widely different religious beliefs , and like political beliefs, these often reflect vastly different opinions on fundamental questions about life and society. That said, many Canadian children learn to swear anyway, and different families will have different household rules about this.
  2. Most do not appreciate being disturbed at work, either. Discussions about French-Canadians and their sense of persecution in Canada, or desires to leave the country, have a strong potential for generating polarized, uncomfortable debate as well — particularly if there are French-Canadians present.
  3. Thumbs down Elbows on the table while eating Generally considered rude in formal settings, though common in more casual situations. Of course, in the end stereotypes are just that — unfair generalizations.
  4. Failing to tip or under-tipping is considered extremely rude and will be immediately noticed.
  5. Failing to tip or under-tipping is considered extremely rude and will be immediately noticed. These traditions were created in response to earlier eras, when voting was done publicly, and people were often harassed or bullied by strangers for their political opinions.

Ties and jackets for men have become increasingly uncommon in all but the most formal or high-ranking office settings. Roles and Formalities Canada is usually considered a mostly egalitarian country in the tradition of other western democracies, meaning respect for hierarchy is not considered a particularly important value in daily life.

Most Canadians are strong individualists of one form or another, and will dislike changing too much of their behaviour or personality to please others — indeed, such aggressive conformity may actually be scorned by others as phony or weak. Modern Canadian children are usually permitted to be relatively outspoken and independent from a young age, and may speak to adults, even teachers or parents, in the same casual way they do to friends.

Authority figures with obviously intimidating powers, such as police officers, will usually be given polite deference as well, though it should be noted that Canadian law and the Canadian Constitution grants individual Canadians significant legal rights to question or disobey authorities whom they have reason to believe are acting improperly. Canadian Attitudes Towards Time For the most part, Canadians are quite literal about time and schedules.

Lateness of more than 15 minutes is considered rude, and an apology or explanation will be expected.

Roles and Formalities

Likewise, earliness of more than 15 minutes is usually considered presumptuous and may cause an awkward surprise for a host who is not yet ready. With some exceptions, telephoning people in the very early morning or very late night is considered rude and disruptive. Most do not appreciate being disturbed at work, either. Weekends Saturday and Sundaywhen most people do not work, tend to be the most busy and active days for socializing, though Sunday morning can be a somewhat taboo time to make plans since many religious Canadians will be attending church.

Canadian Social Customs Greetings Canadians meeting for the first time usually shake hands to introduce themselves, and may shake hands before departing, as well.

  • Likewise, earliness of more than 15 minutes is usually considered presumptuous and may cause an awkward surprise for a host who is not yet ready;
  • The primary justification is protecting children from hearing offensive language that they might imitate;
  • Many of the most common Canadian faiths were actually founded in explicit opposition to one another, and thus promote theories of God and salvation that are mostly incompatible, and may portray non-believers as sinners or heretics of some form or another.

Short hugs are becoming more common for closer friends, particularly women. Kissing remains mostly reserved for family or lovers, though some French-Canadians may partake in the European practice of giving light cheek kisses as part of a friendly greeting.

These days, a lot of Canadian restaurants will give customers the option to give an automatic 10, 15, or 20 per cent tip when they pay many canadians find issues in the government unacceptable a debit or credit card machine, thus sparing them the difficulty of after-dinner math. Giving cash as a gift is generally only done within families. Failing to tip or under-tipping is considered extremely rude and will be immediately noticed. A variety of other professions in Canadian life expect tips as well, including pizza delivery men, taxi drivers, bellhops, and hairdressers, among others.

Confusion over exactly who should and should not be tipped and how much has led to the creation of a lot of helpful online guides. In general, Canadian tipping etiquette is the same as that of the United States, and American tipping manuals are often used for reference in Canada. In general, most rude hand or body gestures are done knowingly, and can be easily avoided as a result. Thumbs down Elbows on the table while eating Generally considered rude in formal settings, though common in more casual situations.

Eating with an open mouth or talking with a full mouth Considered gross. Considered rude if the yawn isn't covered by a hand.

Canadian Attitudes Towards Time

Pointing or staring at strangers Considered rude and a form of leering. Sneezing is weirdly ritualized. Public nudity of any sort is illegaland attempted only by the most avant-garde and attention-seeking. Some may find such displays easy to ignore, while others consider them quite gross and offensive. Unfairly or not, same-sex partners continue to be judged more harshly in this regard.

Manners and Etiquette in Canada

Canadian elections are full of traditions of secrecy, and all votes are anonymous. These traditions were created in response to earlier eras, when voting was done publicly, and people were often harassed or bullied by strangers for their political opinions. Conversation Taboos Politics Aside from those who make outspoken political opinions a large part of their personality, politics is generally considered a mostly private matter in Canada.

Voting is done in secret and Canadians have a legal right to keep their party preferences hidden, even after they leave the voting booth. Publicly spouting strong opinions on topics like these is usually seen as an invitation for argument, which many find obnoxious and insensitive.

In most cases, even mentioning things such as sex organs or sexual acts is considered highly tasteless in any public setting.

Religion Canadians have widely different religious beliefsand like political beliefs, these often reflect vastly different opinions on fundamental questions about life and society. Many of the most common Canadian faiths were actually founded in explicit opposition to one another, and thus promote theories of God and salvation that are mostly incompatible, and may portray non-believers as sinners or heretics of some form or another.

Watch your language Almost all Canadians swear when talking to people they know, but swearing in front of strangers remains controversial. Canadian law does not permit uncensored swearing to be broadcast on TV or radio during the day — and even when it is allowed, it must be prefaced with a warning. The primary justification is protecting children from hearing offensive language that they might imitate. That said, many Canadian children learn to swear anyway, and different families will have different household rules about this.

Other Canadian Taboos Many Canadians have complicated views about the United Statesand mentioning America or Americans can often provoke intense argument or discussion that some might find uncomfortable. Regardless of political context, the issue of abortion is considered almost uniformly taboo to discuss openly, as are any questions or theories about innate differences between genders or members of different races. Discussions about French-Canadians and their sense of persecution in Canada, or desires to leave the country, have a strong potential for generating polarized, uncomfortable debate as well — particularly if there are French-Canadians present.

Others, however, may be more guarded, shy, or sensitive. At best, it can be a sort of positive feedback loop. In practice, a lot of Canadians, particularly those from more upper middle-class backgrounds, take very seriously the idea that they should apologize a lot, or only ask for things in a very roundabout, indirect sort of way.

Of course, in the end stereotypes are just that — unfair generalizations. Each Canadian is ultimately an individual, and as such will likely have his own unique perspective on how to be a decent and well-mannered human being.

More About Canadian Manners and Etiquette.