Term papers writing service


Keeping things organic at ben and jerry s

Genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, are organisms that have had their genetic makeup DNA altered through genetic engineering in a way that does not occur in nature or through traditional breeding methods. GMOs are found in key commodity crops grown in the United States, such as corn, soy and sugar beet.

  • At the heart of our actions is a long-term vision of systemic change that creates more options for non-GMO foods and ingredients;
  • By definition, the manufacturing of products creates waste.

So it's likely that the majority of us eat foods that contain GMOs on a regular basis. So the corn syrup or soy lecithin that appears in some of our chunks and swirls are made from Non-GMO corn and soy based on seed origin.

  • You go to the freezer to grab a pint of your favorite flavor, anticipating a creamy, sweet, melt-in-your-mouth treat, and instead you find something that's not quite right;
  • The effort was worth it and now we can see the benefits of our investment;
  • GMOs are found in key commodity crops grown in the United States, such as corn, soy and sugar beet;
  • Plastic wrap or parchment paper works, too;
  • At the end of 2013, we secured reliable sources of Fairtrade bananas;
  • Although it took us about a year longer than we originally planned, today, all of our ingredients, including the chunks and swirls, are from non-GMO sources by origin.

Just so you know, our ice cream base mix is already totally non-GMO by origin because the ingredients we use are not at risk for GMO sources. However, the fresh Vermont milk and cream, from herds not treated with rBGH that our family farmers supply to us, is not organic.

Highlights in 2015

But because neither the cow nor the milk and cream they provide us are genetically modified, our products would not be required to be labeled as GMO under the regulations pending in several states.

However, we understand the complex issues around GMO animal feed and we are looking into how we can best develop cost effective non-GMO feed options for the family farms that supply our milk and cream.

At the heart of our actions is a long-term vision of systemic change that creates more options for non-GMO foods and ingredients. Our work in this area is focused on: We made steady progress in 2013 and our work in 2014 focused on completing the conversion for our toughest to source ingredients, the chunks and swirls. Although it took us about a year longer than we originally planned, today, all of our ingredients, including the chunks and swirls, are from non-GMO sources by origin.

Trace Amounts of Pesticide Found in Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream

We will continue to verify our ingredients through supplier documentation, which will be reviewed by an independent third-party firm. We also offered testimony at the Massachusetts Legislature that countered food industry claims that mandatory GMO labeling would be expensive, confusing, and raise the cost of food. This bill would have prohibited the FDA from requiring a national standard on labeling.

See Questions about:

Our end goal remains the same: Our theory is that once states start getting involved, this will increase the pressure on Congress to pass a national law, which would be simpler for consumers and easier for food producers to comply with. Learn more about why we support mandatory GMO labeling, and a consumer's right to know.

Made up of dozens of companies and stakeholders in the food industry, our aim is to rebuild a robust non-GMO sector as a pathway to a more diverse, resilient and sustainable food system that creates better long-term outcomes for farmers, consumers, and the environment.

Within the Working Group, we are also working to create conditions that will support the long-term growth of non-GMO supply chains. This includes collaborative work to establish industry standards that will encourage small and large scale food producers to go non-GMO; and bringing together stakeholders to invest in infrastructure needed to support a robust non-GMO supply chain. We are proud of our work with this diverse group and believe that collaborative approaches are necessary to create a more sustainable food system and to create better long-term outcomes for everyone - farmers, consumers, and the environment.

Our milk comes from the St.

Our Values

Albans Cooperative in Vermont, made up of about 400 family farmers; and we have required all of our farmers to pledge not to treat their cows with rBGH. While our products have for decades come from cows not treated with rBGH, we continue to work with a coalition of nonprofit groups and companies in the U. Synthetic Biology We are aware that some food ingredients may soon be available on the market that are derived from new applications of genetic engineering techniques and approaches sometimes referred to as synthetic biology.

Fairtrade Fairtrade is a global movement working to ensure that small farmers in developing countries can compete and thrive in the global economy. When you buy Fairtrade certified products, you can be confident that the farmers who grew the Fairtrade ingredients received a fair price for their harvest.

Questions and Answers about Ben & Jerry's

In return, Fairtrade farmers agree to use environmentally sound farming practices, implement fair working standards, and invest in their communities. Fairtrade Highlights for 2015 In 2015 we kept up efforts to educate consumers about the value of Fairtrade certified products and strengthen the Fairtrade system.

We continued to engage with our Fairtrade Producer Development Initiative PDI partners and started to build linked prosperity relationships within our supply chain.

We continued to be an active member of the Domestic Fair Trade Association. It was a massive undertaking, considering that we had about 80 flavors, 110 ingredients and more than 200 keeping things organic at ben and jerry s products to transition. The effort was worth it and now we can see the benefits of our investment. Fairtrade ensures that all farmers get paid a minimum price to cover the cost of sustainable production, one that never falls below the market price.

But there is an additional sum of money paid on top of that minimum price: Farmers decide for themselves how to invest these funds to improve their lives and livelihoods, as well as those of their communities. There are a few ingredients such as certain fruits, nuts and spices that we are currently unable to source from Fairtrade suppliers. In those cases, Fairtrade International has provided us derogations approved waivers to show that despite our efforts to source these products from Fairtrade suppliers, we were unable to, either because they did not meet our quality specifications or they were just not commercially available to us.

Our products have earned the Fairtrade seal because they meet and in many cases actually exceed the requirements of the Fairtrade Certification by Fairtrade International. Our revised goal was to achieve full conversion to Fairtrade sugar in our base-mix, globally, by end of 2014.

In North America, over 99.

  • Although it took us about a year longer than we originally planned, today, all of our ingredients, including the chunks and swirls, are from non-GMO sources by origin;
  • So the corn syrup or soy lecithin that appears in some of our chunks and swirls are made from Non-GMO corn and soy based on seed origin;
  • In those cases, Fairtrade International has provided us derogations approved waivers to show that despite our efforts to source these products from Fairtrade suppliers, we were unable to, either because they did not meet our quality specifications or they were just not commercially available to us.

Taken together, these ingredients use a significant volume of cocoa powder or cocoa butter. By transitioning to cocoa-based ingredients that are traded in compliance with Fairtrade standards, we can have a significant impact on improving the livelihoods of our cocoa farmers.

Our revised goal was to achieve full conversion to Fairtrade cocoa powder in our base-mix, globally, by end of 2014. Natural flavorings such as vanilla and coffee extract are an important part of the party inside our pints. Our revised goal was to achieve full conversion to Fairtrade vanilla and coffee in our base-mix, globally, by end of 2014.

  1. It was a massive undertaking, considering that we had about 80 flavors, 110 ingredients and more than 200 different products to transition.
  2. We continued to be an active member of the Domestic Fair Trade Association.
  3. While our products have for decades come from cows not treated with rBGH, we continue to work with a coalition of nonprofit groups and companies in the U. Although it took us about a year longer than we originally planned, today, all of our ingredients, including the chunks and swirls, are from non-GMO sources by origin.

Therefore, we did not source any coffee extracts for our 2015 European products. In North America and therefore, globallyall of the coffee used in our products has been traded in compliance with Fairtrade standards since 2013. In North America, 99. Our revised goal was to achieve full conversion to Fairtrade banana puree in our base-mix, globally, by end of 2014.

At the end of 2013, we secured reliable sources of Fairtrade bananas. Our revised goal was to fully convert the five key commodities in our chunks and swirls to Fairtrade-status by the end of 2014.

Although we missed our goal, we made some significant progress in 2015.