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John steinbecks use of foreshadowing in his novel of mice and men

  • In his anger, he shakes Curley's wife to quiet her, but does it so hard that he breaks her neck;
  • This happens in Chapter 3 when Curley starts hitting Lennie and ends up getting his hand crushed in Lennie's powerful grip;
  • So Curley's hostility towards Lennie foreshadows their fight, and the outcome of the fight might be said to foreshadow the death of Curley's flirtatious and apparently promiscuous wife;
  • She chides him to be gentle so he doesn't make a mess of it; she begins to struggle, but Lennie holds on;
  • The incident related in Chapter One foreshadows death:

Additional questions must be posted separately. One of the important things we learn about George and Lennie in Chapter One involves an incident involving Lennie and a young lady in the last town where they worked—Weed. Lennie's intentions are innocent, but he does not understand the limitations of society and appropriate behavior. He does not understand the "rules.

  • They are run out of town;
  • Lennie--if you jus' happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here an' hide in the brush;
  • Can you remember that?
  • Another good example of foreshadowing is seen in Curley's hostile behavior towards Lennie in the bunkhouse in Chapter 2 and Candy's explanation of Curley's character:

They are run out of town. George recalls the incident: She jerks back and you hold on like it was a mouse. She yells and we got to hide in a irrigation ditch all day.

  1. She jerks back and you hold on like it was a mouse. One of the best examples of foreshadowing in Of Mice and Men can be found in the very first chapter when George and Lennie are camping by the river.
  2. She jerks back and you hold on like it was a mouse.
  3. George recalls the incident.
  4. He's alla time picking scraps with big guys. You seen little guys like that, ain't you?
  5. So Curley's hostility towards Lennie foreshadows their fight, and the outcome of the fight might be said to foreshadow the death of Curley's flirtatious and apparently promiscuous wife. She chides him to be gentle so he doesn't make a mess of it; she begins to struggle, but Lennie holds on.

As with the girl's dress, Lennie finds himself in Curley's wife's company, which he desperately tries to avoid on George's instructions, but she will not leave him alone. She offers to let him touch her hair.

  • Lennie--if you jus' happen to get in trouble like you always done before, I want you to come right here an' hide in the brush;
  • Another good example of foreshadowing is seen in Curley's hostile behavior towards Lennie in the bunkhouse in Chapter 2 and Candy's explanation of Curley's character:

When Lennie strokes the young woman's hair, he admits that it is very soft. She chides him to be gentle so he doesn't make a mess of it; she begins to struggle, but Lennie holds on.

What is an example of foreshadowing Steinbeck uses in Of Mice and Men.

Curley's wife becomes frightened and screams, and this sends Lennie out of his mind: That's nice,' and he stroked it harder. His face was contorted. She screamed then, and Lennie's other hand closed over her mouth and nose. Please don't do that. As the woman continues to scream beneath his hand, he begs her to stop; then he becomes infuriated, realizing all he will lose if George finds out: In his anger, he shakes Curley's wife to quiet her, but does it so hard that he breaks her neck.

The incident related in Chapter One foreshadows death: