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A research on the positive and negative aspects and beliefs about the vegan diet

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract The objective of the study was to examine whether reasons to adopt vegetarian lifestyle differ significantly among generations. Younger people significantly agreed more with the moral reason and with the environmental reason. People ages 41—60 significantly agreed more with the health reason.

  • Second, if you eat less of one thing, you will eat more of something else;
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There are significant differences across generations as to why people choose to live a vegetarian lifestyle. There are many variations of vegetarian diets. Semi-vegetarians avoid meat, poultry and fish most of the time. Pesco-vegetarians avoid meat and poultry but eat fish. Lacto-ovo-vegetarians avoid all meat, fish, and poultry but do eat milk, cheese, yogurt, other dairy products and eggs. Vegans avoid in their diet all products of animal origin [ 2 ].

9 Pros and Cons to Going Vegan

Different vegetarian diet variations are chosen for different reasons depending on age, gender, religion, educational level and overall perceived health beliefs. A study conducted in the Netherlands researched the attitudes towards food and health among adults. A study conducted in the UK examined the attitudes toward following a meat, vegetarian or vegan diet and the role of ambivalence emotions on these attitudes.

The results indicated that people tend to have most positive beliefs and attitudes towards their own diets, and most negative beliefs and attitudes towards diets that differ from their own [ 5 ]. There has been an increase in the interest and popularity of the vegetarian lifestyle overtime.

A poll conducted by the same group in 2008 discovered that about 6. Although there has been increased interest in the vegetarian lifestyle overtime, it is not clear what the main reasons are as to why people adopt this lifestyle.

The focus in this report is to examine the beliefs and attitudes towards a vegetarian lifestyle across generations and to report on a theoretical model of the relationships between attitude, beliefs, knowledge and misconception concerning vegetarian lifestyles. Recruitment of Subjects This cross-sectional, observational study was completed at Andrews University which is a Seventh-day Adventist SDA institution of higher learning.

  • Loss of essential vitamins and minerals;
  • In section two a 29-item Food Frequency Questionnaire FFQ was used to accurately ascertain the vegetarian status of the participants;
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SDA represent a unique population known for their wide range of dietary habits. This conservative religious group prohibits the use of alcohol, tobacco, and pork and recommends that members adhere to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet [ 1112 ]. Participants were drawn from a large undergraduate introductory-level nutrition class that is open to students from all academic directions.

Students were recruited by the instructor and assured that anonymity and confidentiality would be maintained. Participation in the study was voluntary. Those who choose to participate received ten bonus points which were counted toward their final grade. Data collection took place over the Thanksgiving holiday in 2007. Students were asked to recruit their parents and grandparents for participation in this survey. Assessment of Food Intake and Attitudes toward Vegetarian Lifestyle Each participant was asked to complete a four-page Lifestyle Practices Survey which consisted of four parts.

Section one had 11 basic census questions gender, ethnicity, marital status, education, occupation, age, etc. In section two a 29-item Food Frequency Questionnaire FFQ was used to accurately ascertain the vegetarian status of the participants. In section three, questions addressed the use of herbs and supplements.

Beliefs and Attitudes toward Vegetarian Lifestyle across Generations

In section four participants were asked to describe which lifestyle they practice non-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian, lacto-ovo-vegetarian, or vegan. Using a Likert Scale from 1 to 5 strongly disagree [ 1 ]—agree[ 2 ]—no opinion[ 3 ]—agree[ 4 ]—strongly agree[ 5 ] participants answered questions concerning their attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, and misconceptions about vegetarian lifestyles Table 1. Table 1 Selected questions used to assess nutritional knowledge, health food beliefs, attitudes toward vegetarian lifestyle and nutritional misconceptions.

  1. Disadvantages of a vegan diet.
  2. In section two a 29-item Food Frequency Questionnaire FFQ was used to accurately ascertain the vegetarian status of the participants.
  3. Pure and impartial science is not fashionable, and cannot be heard above the din of clashing and frequently uninformed views.

Descriptive data was tested for normality. Pearson correlations were examined to check for the internal validity of the data.

  1. These questions are a source of confusion for the general public, and for many scientists too.
  2. However, animal products should be put in their place, which is clearly at not the base of the food pyramid.
  3. Those who choose to participate received ten bonus points which were counted toward their final grade. May promote greater self-control.
  4. May promote greater self-control.

In the development of the lifestyle questionnaire cluster analysis was used to group the questions into four separate areas labeled: Results and Discussion 3. Sample Size and Characteristics Overall there were 609 participants who completed the survey. Descriptive data are shown in Table 2. The mean age was 32.

  • This article was originally published in French;
  • However, attention should be paid to diets that exclude certain product categories, because such exclusions could have significant nutritional consequences for certain consumers.

The mean BMI was 25.