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A report on the money in the 90s

Zillions: The ’90s Kids Magazine About Money

After all, there is an entire industry devoted to parting your hard earned cash from you, yet most commentary on this is directed to your parents. Zillions covered how marketing and advertising work, the ways kids could earn and save money, and discussed alternatives to spending.

One study the writers highlighted found that kids are exposed to 3,000 ads every day. Zillions made an enormous impression on my understanding of money. I was always curious about the people behind it, so I contacted Jeff Fuerst, an editor at Zillions throughout its run.

For kids who were interested in the media they were exposed to, Zillions pulled back the curtain on the adult work of marketing.

  1. On February 11 a summary "Fact Sheet" about the policy was publicly released.
  2. Zillions showed gender bias in the kinds of jobs and products kids are offered and opened a dialogue. Or about the trend of wearing watches in your hair?
  3. A summer issue of Zillions advised renting old movies from the library if the new releases were checked out, since the plots were rehashed anyway. Readers wrote in to suggest positive alternatives to spending, like reusing items from your last school year, borrowing toys, and shopping at thrift stores.
  4. Or about the trend of wearing watches in your hair? But Zillions also covered more common and low-profile dangers, like sexism.
  5. I was always curious about the people behind it, so I contacted Jeff Fuerst, an editor at Zillions throughout its run.

If you ever wondered why a A report on the money in the 90s. In almost every issue, kids and scientists put products Zillions had purchased through rigorous tests, before giving it a rating in categories like fun, value, and quality. This exposed kids to the fact that not only is there such a job as food stylist, but that they were there to glue together parts of burgers or grease them up with Vaseline.

Did you know that ads for cereal use glue and hair products instead of milk? Granted, the writers at Zillions often took the adult view that brand name clothes are a rip off and decried impulse purchases and the science that manufactured them, but they were also proactive with alternatives. In the Zillions world, what you could do for free with what you already had was probably just as, if not more fun than a hot new product.

A summer issue of Zillions advised renting old movies from the library if the new releases were checked out, since the plots were rehashed anyway. Readers wrote in to suggest positive alternatives to spending, like reusing items from your last school year, borrowing toys, and shopping at thrift stores. Zillions is probably the first place I saw people brag about how cheap they got something.

  1. But in the end, Zillions exposed me to the most realistic of adult concerns.
  2. In my memory, Zillions was felled by the Internet.
  3. This exposed kids to the fact that not only is there such a job as food stylist, but that they were there to glue together parts of burgers or grease them up with Vaseline. Chairman of the Budget Committee, Senator Jim Sasser, stated "The President took one giant leap for starry-eyed political rhetoric, and not even a small step for fiscal responsibility.
  4. After all, there is an entire industry devoted to parting your hard earned cash from you, yet most commentary on this is directed to your parents. If you ever wondered why a G.

Naturally, a publication by adults and for kids will touch on typical marketing bad guys like smoking, popularity, and violence. But Zillions also covered more common and low-profile dangers, like sexism. Zillions showed gender bias in the kinds of jobs and products kids are offered and opened a dialogue.

Space Exploration Initiative

When kids asked why ads for board games almost always showed boys winning, Zillions followed up with a marketer who believed that boys would be turned off by images of victorious girls — and these were games aimed at both genders! Unfortunately, Zillions folded in 2000.

As a subscriber, I got a card in the mail announcing the change, eventually recycled all my copies and never saw Zillions again. We forget how anxious kids are to learn about the adult world, which is part of the attraction of magazines.

Children of the

I read Seventeen and CosmoGirl to know what older teens were thinking. But in the end, Zillions exposed me to the most realistic of adult concerns: In the back of my mind I figured if I ever got really desperate to read it again, I could go to the Library of Congress.

The so-called millennial generation are more focused on money, image and fame.

I did get desperate. Kids wrote in with fads they had noticed in their area, but especially their schools. Or about the trend of wearing watches in your hair? The suggestions for the cards, which ranged from gross to breathtakingly useful were sent in by kids and illustrated by a former MAD illustrator who was incredibly talented in drawing gross ideas as gruesomely as possible.

This back page of the magazine mocked celebrity endorsements with increasingly absurd products with hilarious names. This was a great parody of actual teen dramas as well as the spending pressures of trends, but also about being a good friend.

I spent a lot of time at the Library of Congress just reading it instead of scanning. Kids most objected to ads where people were mean to each other or refused to share. The magazine even held a poll asking if Bug Squad was good or bad. In my memory, Zillions was felled by the Internet.