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A lab exercise on the methods to determine oxidation lipids

Studies on the dose-efficiency of this training procedure remain to be performed. Actually, most of these studies used a moderate weekly amount of exercise in most papers 135 min per week according to the guidelines available in the early 2000s. It is interesting to point out that such a moderate training protocol has demonstrable metabolic effects, as evidenced by two biopsy studies [ 2030 ]. This effect of training at the level of maximal lipid oxidation on the ability to oxidize lipids at exercise is demonstrated in all studies including this measurement.

Therefore it is clear that the ability to oxidize lipids at exercise is increased by this kind of targeted training.

Determination of the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation.

Whether it also modifies resting energy expenditure and resting lipid oxidation and make training more effective over 24 h remains to be studied. The central questions about such protocols targeted at lipid oxidation levels are as the following: The debate is sometimes passionate but we think that both questions are not yet resolved and deserve careful consideration.

Personal targeting of exercise training is a classic issue in respiratory diseases so that some guidelines recommend it [ 33 ] on the basis of studies showing its superiority [ 34 ]. However other guidelines consider that there is no clear advantage of targeting and that standard procedures are efficient enough [ 35 ].

  • There is also a dose-response relationship between the crude amount of exercise expressed in METs and the loss of abdominal fat [ 41 ];
  • Moreover, the Bland and Altman analysis showed a large random error 0;
  • Influence of exercise protocol Individual data related to the influence of the exercise protocol tMAP versus MAP used to calculate metabolic indices assessed by the D method are shown in Fig;
  • However few recent studies suggest that the ability to oxidize lipids may explain the interindividual variability of the efficiency of exercise-based weight reduction procedures, so that individuals oxidizing more lipids at rest [ 42 , 43 ] or during exercise [ 44 , 45 ] respond better to exercise.

However, dyspnea being not a key symptom in obesity or diabetes, it was logic to propose a model of training based on a more metabolic parameter and the level of maximal lipid oxidation has been logically proposed for this purpose [ 13839 ].

There is also a dose-response relationship between the crude amount of exercise expressed in METs and the loss of abdominal fat [ 41 ]. However few recent studies suggest that the ability to oxidize lipids may explain the interindividual variability of the efficiency of exercise-based weight reduction procedures, so that individuals oxidizing more lipids at rest [ 4243 ] or during exercise [ 4445 ] respond better to exercise.

  • However, on inspection, the individual data clearly showed disagreement between the two protocols, with a maximum difference of 150W for the fitter subjects Fig;
  • Comparison with aerobic interval training [ 28 ] suggests that the latter exhibits stronger effects on aerobic capacity, blood pressure, and blood lipids, while training targeted on lipids induces a greater fat loss and a better improvement of blood glucose levels in diabetics.

Since exercise may have both orexigenic and satietogenic effects [ 46 ] in trained and healthy participantsit can also be assumed that lipid oxidizing exercise is less orexigenic because it minimizes carbohydrate waste that occurs at higher intensities and may increase appetite. Accordingly, the weight-reducing effect of exercise targeted at the LIPOXmax may be mediated in part by alterations in food intake [ 47 ]. Although this issue remains conflictual, it is logic to investigate this question more thoroughly.

At this time our meta-analysis of available data is unable to address this question. Studies comparing training targeted on lipid oxidation with other training procedures are scarce. Comparison with aerobic interval training [ 28 ] suggests that the latter exhibits stronger effects on aerobic capacity, blood pressure, and blood lipids, while training targeted on lipids induces a greater fat loss and a better improvement of blood glucose levels in diabetics.

Clearly this issue requires more investigation. If an interesting efficiency of exercise training targeted on lipid oxidation, as suggested by this meta-analysis, were further demonstrated, this method would appear rather attractive because the exercise test used for the targeting is easy to perform and does not require a maximal stress which is not always safe in obese or diabetic patients.

Physical Activity Targeted at Maximal Lipid Oxidation: A Meta-Analysis

In most countries a test before exercise training is required to ensure the safety of the procedure and is most of the time also used for targeting. In conclusion, this meta-analysis shows that training targeted at maximal fat oxidation mostly used 3 times a week decreases fat mass and body weight and improves blood cholesterol.

This method seems thus to be interesting in chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, but this evidence is based on small size studies and a host of issues remain to be clarified. Mostly, large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings. Conflict of Interests There is no conflict of interests.

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