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A comparison between taoism and buddhism form a philosophical and religions tradition

Although textbooks often distinguish between 'religious' and 'philosophical' Taoism, this is an artificial distinction, and is no more than the difference found in all religions between the practices of the faith, and the theological and philosophical ideas behind them. Chinese and Western Taoist philosophy A more useful distinction might be between Chinese Taoism and Westernised Taoism because some forms of Westernised Taoist philosophy add unauthentic new age and other faith elements to Taoism, while removing much of its religious content; and few Western 'Taoists' include Taoist gods and goddesses, liturgy, worship, or specifically religious meditative practices in their religious life.

Very few Westerners have adopted its gods and goddesses, although there are a few organizations. There are Taoist temples, monasteries and priests, rituals and ceremoniesand a host of gods and goddesses for believers to worship.

  • Buddhism, on the other hand, was established a few centuries earlier than Taoism;
  • A simple, ascetic lifestyle is the norm in Daoist monasteries;
  • Both, Taoism and Buddhism are great philosophical ideologies with long histories, traditions, religions and have played an important part in influencing and shaping the Chinese culture and values.

These are as vital to the survival of Taoism as individual understanding and practice. Taoism's rich palette of liturgy and ritual makes the Tao more real to human beings and provides a way in which humanity can align itself more closely to the Tao to produce better lives for all.

Difference between Taoism and Buddhism

The religious elements of Taoism draw much of their content from other Chinese religions including many local cultsand so enfold a very wide range of culture and belief within the wings of the Tao. The many traditions within the Taoist framework gives priests the tools to carry out the conventional tasks of any religion: Most Taoist temple practices are designed to regulate the relationship between humanity and the world of gods and spirits, and to organise that relationship, and the relationships in the spirit world, in harmony with the Tao.

Religious Taoism traditions Two traditions Religious Taoism follows two main traditions. Each has a clear hierarchical and well-organised structure with special headquarters, rules, guidelines, ordination rites and registration procedures.

  1. Everybody is kept busy at all times, and all movements throughout the day are exactly prescribed and have to be executed with utmost control.
  2. This concept of Taoism was based on the philosophical and political text written by Laozi Lao Tzu between the 3rd or 4th centuries B. The time schedule is very rigid.
  3. The Taoist traveller makes such journeys through ritual, meditation, and visualisation which separate them from this world and harmonise them with the energy flows of the universe.
  4. Usually meditation, sleep periods, and meals are times of complete silence, and even at other times words are to be used with care and circumspection. Although textbooks often distinguish between 'religious' and 'philosophical' Taoism, this is an artificial distinction, and is no more than the difference found in all religions between the practices of the faith, and the theological and philosophical ideas behind them.

The Complete Perfection School ordains people and provides monastic communities as a focus for Taoist practice and rituals. A simple, ascetic lifestyle is the norm in Daoist monasteries. They are ruled by a strict hierarchy, with the abbot at the head, the prior as the key manager of personnel assisted by an overseer and several scribesthe provost as main administrator assisted by a superintendent, treasurer, cellarer, as well as several vergers and cooksand the meditation master in charge of spiritual practice assisted by an ordination master, manager of offerings, and several overseers.

Religious and philosophical Taoism

The time schedule is very rigid: It consists of several periods of seated meditation, worship, meals, and work, including- musch as in Chan Buddhism-work in the gardens and the fields. Everybody is kept busy at all times, and all movements throughout the day are exactly prescribed and have to be executed with utmost control. Usually meditation, sleep periods, and meals are times of complete silence, and even at other times words are to be used with care and circumspection. Daoists, moreover, observe the natural cycles of the seasons and often eschew the use of artificial lights, so that their winter days are a great deal shorter than those in summer, allowing for more extensive rest in the darker phases of the year.

Livia Kohn, Daoism and Chinese Culture Taoist priests Taoist priests undergo long and intense training to acquire the necessary skills.

  1. Usually meditation, sleep periods, and meals are times of complete silence, and even at other times words are to be used with care and circumspection. Everybody is kept busy at all times, and all movements throughout the day are exactly prescribed and have to be executed with utmost control.
  2. The many traditions within the Taoist framework gives priests the tools to carry out the conventional tasks of any religion. This principle can only be achieved when all the sufferings are surpassed, and by following its 8 core values i.
  3. Taoism began in the 6th B. Very few Westerners have adopted its gods and goddesses, although there are a few organizations...
  4. The journeys gradually move them closer and closer to the Tao itself.

They must study music, liturgy and ritual, as well as meditation and other physical practices; and they must learn Taoist theology and the spiritual hierarchy of the Taoist deities. During this training they are required to live highly disciplined lives. Shamanism Taoist experts believe that they can journey in spirit to higher realms of being - in much the same way that Shamans can journey out of the body. The Taoist traveller makes such journeys through ritual, meditation, and visualisation which separate them from this world and harmonise them with the energy flows of the universe.

The journeys gradually move them closer and closer to the Tao itself.